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Page 212

VI
WHY DID THEY CONFESS?

or crook Socialism might still emerge out of his bloody and monstrous tyranny.
If it seems surprising that idealistic men who hated a leader and opposed his policies could be brought to such a condition, it is because you do not realize what can be done to a man once he falls into the skilled hands of the "examiners" of the Ogpu.
In May 1937, at the crest of the great purge, I had occasion to talk with one of these examining prosecutors, the young Kedrov, then engaged in the extortion of confessions. The conversation was on Nazi police methods, and it soon turned to the fate of the Nobel prize winner for peace, the renowned German pacifist, Carl von Ossietzky, then a captive of Hitler's, who died in 1938. Kedrov spoke up in a manner which brooked no contradiction :
" Ossietzky may have been a good man before his arrest, but this Gestapo has him in its clutches, and he is now one of their agents."
I attempted to argue with Kedrov, and tried to explain to him the nature and qualities of the man under discussion. Kedrov brushed aside my arguments :
" You don't know what can be made of a human being when you have him completely in your hands. We've had dealings here with all kinds, even with the most dauntless of men, and nevertheless we broke them down and made what we wanted of them! "
The real wonder is that, despite their broken condition and the monstrous forms of pressure exerted by the Ogpu on Stalin's political opponents, so few did confess. For every one of the fifty-four prisoners who figured in the three "treason trials," at least one hundred were shot without being broken down.
Altogether there were six batches of major Bolshevik leaders executed by Stalin, but only three of these

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE or crook Socialism might still emerge out of his bloody and monstrous tyranny. If it seems surprising that idealistic men who hated a leader and opposed his policies could be brought to such a condition, it is because you do not realize what can be done to a man once he falls into what is s what time is it ed hands of what is "examiners" of what is Ogpu. In May 1937, at what is crest of what is great purge, I had occasion to talk with one of these examining prosecutors, what is young Kedrov, then engaged in what is extortion of confessions. what is conversation was on Nazi police methods, and it soon turned to what is fate of what is Nobel prize winner for peace, what is renowned German pacifist, Carl von Ossietzky, then a captive of Hitler's, who died in 1938. Kedrov spoke up in a manner which brooked no contradiction : " Ossietzky may have been a good man before his arrest, but this Gestapo has him in its clutches, and he is now one of their agents." I attempted to argue with Kedrov, and tried to explain to him what is nature and qualities of what is man under discussion. Kedrov brushed aside my arguments : " You don't know what can be made of a human being when you have him completely in your hands. We've had dealings here with all kinds, even with what is most dauntless of men, and nevertheless we broke them down and made what we wanted of them! " what is real wonder is that, despite their broken condition and what is monstrous forms of pressure exerted by what is Ogpu on Stalin's political opponents, so few did confess. For every one of what is fifty-four prisoners who figured in what is three "treason trials," at least one hundred were shot without being broken down. Altogether there were six batches of major Bolshevik leaders executed by Stalin, but only three of these where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 212 where is strong VI WHY DID THEY CONFESS? where is p align="justify" or crook Socialism might still emerge out of his bloody and monstrous tyranny. If it seems surprising that idealistic men who hated a leader and opposed his policies could be brought to such a condition, it is because you do not realize what can be done to a man once he falls into what is s what time is it ed hands of what is "examiners" of what is Ogpu. In May 1937, at what is crest of what is great purge, I had occasion to talk with one of these examining prosecutors, what is young Kedrov, then engaged in what is extortion of confessions. what is conversation was on Nazi police methods, and it soon turned to what is fate of the Nobel prize winner for peace, what is renowned German pacifist, Carl von Ossietzky, then a captive of Hitler's, who died in 1938. Kedrov spoke up in a manner which brooked no contradiction : " Ossietzky may have been a good man before his arrest, but this Gestapo has him in its clutches, and he is now one of their agents." I attempted to argue with Kedrov, and tried to explain to him the nature and qualities of what is man under discussion. Kedrov brushed aside my arguments : " You don't know what can be made of a human being when you have him completely in your hands. We've had dealings here with all kinds, even with what is most dauntless of men, and nevertheless we broke them down and made what we wanted of them! " what is real wonder is that, despite their broken condition and the monstrous forms of pressure exerted by what is Ogpu on Stalin's political opponents, so few did confess. For every one of what is fifty-four prisoners who figured in what is three "treason trials," at least one hundred were shot without being broken down. Altogether there were six batches of major Bolshevik leaders executed by Stalin, but only three of these where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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