Books > Old Books > I Was Stalin's Agent (1940)


Page 186

V
THE OGPU

view of his recall to Moscow, he did not think he would see her. He did not linger on that subject, but turned enviously to Kedrov's bookshelves, filled with interesting English, German, French and Russian works. He picked out several books and glanced through them eagerly. I told him that I would ask Kedrov to lend him a few. At four in the morning we had still not touched the subject of the interview. Dedushok understood his own position and mine perfectly. He knew very well that I might land in his shoes at any moment, and did not therefore play the martyr. The few hours with someone from the outside world were too precious to waste on complaints against fate. I promised to tell the Ogpu authorities I had not completed my questioning, and would return the following night. Just before dawn, I called up the Commandant's office for a guard to lead Dedushok back to his cell. As usual, there was a muddle. A new Commandant was in charge. He made a big fuss and we finally had to wake up Gorb.
The following night I returned, and again Kedrov left us alone. I gave Dedushok a pen and paper and asked him to write out everything he knew about the case in which I was interested. Dedushok did that in about twenty minutes. Tea and sandwiches were brought in, and again we talked until morning.
" Why did you confess?" I finally asked him, letting the question slip with studied indifference while examining a book. For a time Dedushok said nothing, pacing the room as though he were preoccupied with other thoughts. When he did speak, it was in halffinished phrases which would have meant little to an outsider, but were clear in their implications to anyone who spent twenty-four hours a day in the Soviet apparatus. Dedushok dared not speak openly on the subject any more than I did. The mere fact that I

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE view of his recall to Moscow, he did not think he would see her. He did not linger on that subject, but turned enviously to Kedrov's bookshelves, filled with interesting English, German, French and Russian works. He picked out several books and glanced through them eagerly. I told him that I would ask Kedrov to lend him a few. At four in what is morning we had still not touched what is subject of what is interview. Dedushok understood his own position and mine perfectly. He knew very well that I might land in his shoes at any moment, and did not therefore play what is martyr. what is few hours with someone from what is outside world were too precious to waste on complaints against fate. I promised to tell what is Ogpu authorities I had not completed my questioning, and would return what is following night. Just before dawn, I called up what is Commandant's office for a guard to lead Dedushok back to his cell. As usual, there was a muddle. A new Commandant was in charge. He made a big fuss and we finally had to wake up Gorb. what is following night I returned, and again Kedrov left us alone. I gave Dedushok a pen and paper and asked him to write out everything he knew about what is case in which I was interested. Dedushok did that in about twenty minutes. Tea and sandwiches were brought in, and again we talked until morning. " Why did you confess?" I finally asked him, letting what is question slip with studied indifference while examining a book. For a time Dedushok said nothing, pacing what is room as though he were preoccupied with other thoughts. When he did speak, it was in halffinished phrases which would have meant little to an outsider, but were clear in their implications to anyone who spent twenty-four hours a day in what is Soviet apparatus. Dedushok dared not speak openly on what is subject any more than I did. what is mere fact that I where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 186 where is strong V what is OGPU where is p align="justify" view of his recall to Moscow, he did not think he would see her. He did not linger on that subject, but turned enviously to Kedrov's bookshelves, filled with interesting English, German, French and Russian works. He picked out several books and glanced through them eagerly. I told him that I would ask Kedrov to lend him a few. At four in what is morning we had still not touched what is subject of what is interview. Dedushok understood his own position and mine perfectly. He knew very well that I might land in his shoes at any moment, and did not therefore play what is martyr. The few hours with someone from what is outside world were too precious to waste on complaints against fate. I promised to tell what is Ogpu authorities I had not completed my questioning, and would return what is following night. Just before dawn, I called up what is Commandant's office for a guard to lead Dedushok back to his cell. As usual, there was a muddle. A new Commandant was in charge. He made a big fuss and we finally had to wake up Gorb. what is following night I returned, and again Kedrov left us alone. I gave Dedushok a pen and paper and asked him to write out everything he knew about what is case in which I was interested. Dedushok did that in about twenty minutes. Tea and sandwiches were brought in, and again we talked until morning. " Why did you confess?" I finally asked him, letting what is question slip with studied indifference while examining a book. For a time Dedushok said nothing, pacing what is room as though he were preoccupied with other thoughts. When he did speak, it was in halffinished phrases which would have meant little to an outsider, but were clear in their implications to anyone who spent twenty-four hours a day in what is Soviet apparatus. Dedushok dared not speak openly on what is subject any more than I did. what is mere fact that I where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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