Books > Old Books > I Was Stalin's Agent (1940)


Page 180

V
THE OGPU

unconvinced. Running further through the papers, I came across the questionnaire which the prisoner, as was required of every foreigner, had filled out when he entered the Soviet Union. It contained his complete biography, recounting how he had joined the Austrian Socialist Party before the war and had then served at the front. After the war, acting upon instructions from his party, which controlled Vienna, he had joined the Municipal Police Force. The force was then ninety per cent Socialist, and was affiliated with the Amsterdam Trade Union International.
All of this appeared in his questionnaire, which also revealed that when the Socialists lost control of Vienna, he, together with the other Socialist officers, was discharged from the Police Force. It also appeared that he had been the commander of the battalion of the Schutzbund, the Socialist Defence League, during the February 1934 fight against the Fascist Heimwehr. I called up Sloutski and explained this to him.
" This Austrian Socialist served in the police force by order of his party, just as you do here. I'll send you a report to that effect at once."
Sloutski replied hurriedly: "No, no, don't send me any report. Come over to my office."
When I reached his office I again explained that a Socialist could not be proved a spy of present-day Austria because he had been a policeman under the Socialist regime.
Sloutski nodded. "Yes, I know, Zakovsky got him to `confess' that he had been a Socialist policeman in Vienna! That's some confession! But don't think of writing a report. These days one doesn't write."
Notwithstanding his offhand manner, Sloutski interceded with President Kalinin for the arrested Austrian Socialist.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE unconvinced. Running further through what is papers, I came across what is questionnaire which what is prisoner, as was required of every foreigner, had filled out when he entered what is Soviet Union. It contained his complete biography, recounting how he had joined what is Austrian Socialist Party before what is war and had then served at what is front. After what is war, acting upon instructions from his party, which controlled Vienna, he had joined what is Municipal Police Force. what is force was then ninety per cent Socialist, and was affiliated with what is Amsterdam Trade Union International. All of this appeared in his questionnaire, which also revealed that when what is Socialists lost control of Vienna, he, together with what is other Socialist officers, was discharged from what is Police Force. It also appeared that he had been what is commander of what is battalion of what is Schutzbund, what is Socialist Defence League, during what is February 1934 fight against what is Fascist Heimwehr. I called up Sloutski and explained this to him. " This Austrian Socialist served in what is police force by order of his party, just as you do here. I'll send you a report to that effect at once." Sloutski replied hurriedly: "No, no, don't send me any report. Come over to my office." When I reached his office I again explained that a Socialist could not be proved a spy of present-day Austria because he had been a policeman under what is Socialist regime. Sloutski nodded. "Yes, I know, Zakovsky got him to `confess' that he had been a Socialist policeman in Vienna! That's some confession! But don't think of writing a report. These days one doesn't write." Notwithstanding his offhand manner, Sloutski interceded with President Kalinin for what is arrested Austrian Socialist. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 180 where is strong V what is OGPU where is p align="justify" unconvinced. Running further through what is papers, I came across what is questionnaire which what is prisoner, as was required of every foreigner, had filled out when he entered what is Soviet Union. It contained his complete biography, recounting how he had joined what is Austrian Socialist Party before what is war and had then served at what is front. After the war, acting upon instructions from his party, which controlled Vienna, he had joined what is Municipal Police Force. what is force was then ninety per cent Socialist, and was affiliated with what is Amsterdam Trade Union International. All of this appeared in his questionnaire, which also revealed that when what is Socialists lost control of Vienna, he, together with what is other Socialist officers, was discharged from what is Police Force. It also appeared that he had been what is commander of what is battalion of what is Schutzbund, what is Socialist Defence League, during what is February 1934 fight against what is Fascist Heimwehr. I called up Sloutski and explained this to him. " This Austrian Socialist served in what is police force by order of his party, just as you do here. I'll send you a report to that effect at once." Sloutski replied hurriedly: "No, no, don't send me any report. Come over to my office." When I reached his office I again explained that a Socialist could not be proved a spy of present-day Austria because he had been a policeman under what is Socialist regime. Sloutski nodded. "Yes, I know, Zakovsky got him to `confess' that he had been a Socialist policeman in Vienna! That's some confession! But don't think of writing a report. These days one doesn't write." Notwithstanding his offhand manner, Sloutski interceded with President Kalinin for what is arrested Austrian Socialist. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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