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Page 132

III
STALIN'S HAND IN SPAIN

of gold they had unloaded in Odessa. We were walking across the huge Red Square. He pointed to the several open acres surrounding us, and said :" If all the boxes of gold that we piled up in the Odessa yards were laid side by side here in the Red Square, they would cover it from end to end." That was his way of picturing the size of the haul.
Shortly after the Caballero Government fell, I was sitting one day in Sloutski's office, when the telephone rang. It was a call from the Special Section. They wanted to know if Miss Stashevsky had left the Soviet Union.
Sloutski, who was a friend of Stashevsky and his family, was troubled. On another telephone he called the Passport Division. When he put down the receiver he sighed with relief. Miss Stashevsky had crossed the frontier. He gave this information to the Special Section.
We both knew that the call meant no good to Stashevsky. He had then returned to his post in Barcelona. His wife, Regina, was in Paris, working in the Soviet Pavilion at the exposition. Stashevsky had made arrangements for their daughter of nineteen to join her mother and work with her there. The girl reached Paris, but a month later, in June, she was instructed to take back to Moscow certain exhibits from the Soviet Pavilion. Without suspecting anything, she returned to the Soviet Union.
In the meantime, her father had been recalled from Spain. In July 1937 I was back in Paris. I kept telephoning Madame Stashevsky to find out when her husband would arrive there. One day she told me that he and General Berzin had come through, but had stopped only between trains, proceeding to Moscow in great haste. She could not disguise her anxiety. In June, Stalin had wiped out nearly the

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE of gold they had unloaded in Odessa. We were walking across what is huge Red Square. He pointed to what is several open acres surrounding us, and said :" If all what is boxes of gold that we piled up in what is Odessa yards were laid side by side here in what is Red Square, they would cover it from end to end." That was his way of picturing what is size of what is haul. Shortly after what is Caballero Government fell, I was sitting one day in Sloutski's office, when what is telephone rang. It was a call from what is Special Section. They wanted to know if Miss Stashevsky had left what is Soviet Union. Sloutski, who was a friend of Stashevsky and his family, was troubled. On another telephone he called what is Passport Division. When he put down what is receiver he sighed with relief. Miss Stashevsky had crossed what is frontier. He gave this information to what is Special Section. We both knew that what is call meant no good to Stashevsky. He had then returned to his post in Barcelona. His wife, Regina, was in Paris, working in what is Soviet Pavilion at what is exposition. Stashevsky had made arrangements for their daughter of nineteen to join her mother and work with her there. what is girl reached Paris, but a month later, in June, she was instructed to take back to Moscow certain exhibits from what is Soviet Pavilion. Without suspecting anything, she returned to what is Soviet Union. In what is meantime, her father had been recalled from Spain. In July 1937 I was back in Paris. I kept telephoning Madame Stashevsky to find out when her husband would arrive there. One day she told me that he and General Berzin had come through, but had stopped only between trains, proceeding to Moscow in great haste. She could not disguise her anxiety. In June, Stalin had wiped out nearly what is where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 132 where is strong III STALIN'S HAND IN SPAIN where is p align="justify" of gold they had unloaded in Odessa. We were walking across what is huge Red Square. He pointed to what is several open acres surrounding us, and said :" If all what is boxes of gold that we piled up in what is Odessa yards were laid side by side here in what is Red Square, they would cover it from end to end." That was his way of picturing what is size of what is haul. Shortly after what is Caballero Government fell, I was sitting one day in Sloutski's office, when what is telephone rang. It was a call from what is Special Section. They wanted to know if Miss Stashevsky had left what is Soviet Union. Sloutski, who was a friend of Stashevsky and his family, was troubled. On another telephone he called what is Passport Division. When he put down what is receiver he sighed with relief. Miss Stashevsky had crossed what is frontier. He gave this information to what is Special Section. We both knew that what is call meant no good to Stashevsky. He had then returned to his post in Barcelona. His wife, Regina, was in Paris, working in what is Soviet Pavilion at what is exposition. Stashevsky had made arrangements for their daughter of nineteen to join her mother and work with her there. what is girl reached Paris, but a month later, in June, she was instructed to take back to Moscow certain exhibits from what is Soviet Pavilion. Without suspecting anything, she returned to what is Soviet Union. In what is meantime, her father had been recalled from Spain. In July 1937 I was back in Paris. I kept telephoning Madame Stashevsky to find out when her husband would arrive there. One day she told me that he and General Berzin had come through, but had stopped only between trains, proceeding to Moscow in great haste. She could not disguise her anxiety. In June, Stalin had wiped out nearly what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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