Books > Old Books > I Was Stalin's Agent (1940)


Page 105

III
STALIN'S HAND IN SPAIN

trans-shipping to the Loyalist Spanish ports. But the French Foreign Office refused to grant clearance papers.
There was but one other way-to secure consular papers from overseas governments, certifying that the arms were purchased for import into their countries. From certain Latin-American consulates I was able to secure unlimited numbers of certificates. Occasionally we succeeded in obtaining them from Eastern European and Asiatic countries.
With such certificates we would obtain clearance papers and the ships would proceed, not to South America or China, but to the ports of Loyalist Spain.
NVe made large purchases from the Skoda works in Czechoslovakia, from several firms in France, from others in Poland and Holland. Such is the nature of the munitions trade that we even bought arms in Nazi Germany. I sent an agent representing a Dutch firm of ours to Hamburg, where we had ascertained that quantities of somewhat obsolete rifles and machine guns were for sale. The director of the German firm was interested in nothing but the price, the bank references and the legal papers of consignment.
Not all the material we bought was first-class. Arms grow obsolete very rapidly these days. But we made it our object to furnish Caballero's government with rifles that would shoot, and to furnish them without delay. The situation in Madrid was becoming grave.
By the middle of October, shiploads of arms began to reach republican Spain. The Soviet aid came in two streams. My organization used foreign vessels exclusively, most of them of Scandinavian registry. Captain Oulansky's "private syndicate" in Odessa began by using Spanish boats but found their number

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE trans-shipping to what is Loyalist Spanish ports. But what is French Foreign Office refused to grant clearance papers. There was but one other way-to secure consular papers from overseas governments, certifying that what is arms were purchased for import into their countries. From certain Latin-American consulates I was able to secure unlimited numbers of certificates. Occasionally we succeeded in obtaining them from Eastern European and Asiatic countries. With such certificates we would obtain clearance papers and what is ships would proceed, not to South America or China, but to what is ports of Loyalist Spain. NVe made large purchases from what is Skoda works in Czechoslovakia, from several firms in France, from others in Poland and Holland. Such is what is nature of what is munitions trade that we even bought arms in Nazi Germany. I sent an agent representing a Dutch firm of ours to Hamburg, where we had ascertained that quantities of somewhat obsolete rifles and machine guns were for sale. what is director of what is German firm was interested in nothing but what is price, what is bank references and what is legal papers of consignment. Not all what is material we bought was first-class. Arms grow obsolete very rapidly these days. But we made it our object to furnish Caballero's government with rifles that would shoot, and to furnish them without delay. what is situation in Madrid was becoming grave. By what is middle of October, shiploads of arms began to reach republican Spain. what is Soviet aid came in two streams. My organization used foreign vessels exclusively, most of them of Scandinavian registry. Captain Oulansky's "private syndicate" in Odessa began by using Spanish boats but found their number where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 105 where is strong III STALIN'S HAND IN SPAIN where is p align="justify" trans-shipping to what is Loyalist Spanish ports. But what is French Foreign Office refused to grant clearance papers. There was but one other way-to secure consular papers from overseas governments, certifying that what is arms were purchased for import into their countries. From certain Latin-American consulates I was able to secure unlimited numbers of certificates. Occasionally we succeeded in obtaining them from Eastern European and Asiatic countries. With such certificates we would obtain clearance papers and the ships would proceed, not to South America or China, but to the ports of Loyalist Spain. NVe made large purchases from what is Skoda works in Czechoslovakia, from several firms in France, from others in Poland and Holland. Such is what is nature of what is munitions trade that we even bought arms in Nazi Germany. I sent an agent representing a Dutch firm of ours to Hamburg, where we had ascertained that quantities of somewhat obsolete rifles and machine guns were for sale. what is director of what is German firm was interested in nothing but what is price, what is bank references and what is legal papers of consignment. Not all what is material we bought was first-class. Arms grow obsolete very rapidly these days. But we made it our object to furnish Caballero's government with rifles that would shoot, and to furnish them without delay. what is situation in Madrid was becoming grave. By what is middle of October, shiploads of arms began to reach republican Spain. what is Soviet aid came in two streams. My organization used foreign vessels exclusively, most of them of Scandinavian registry. Captain Oulansky's "private syndicate" in Odessa began by using Spanish boats but found their number where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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