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Page 104

III
STALIN'S HAND IN SPAIN

European chain of ostensibly independent concerns, in addition to our existing "business" outposts, for the purpose of importing and exporting war materials. It was new to us, but it is an ancient profession in Europe.
Success depended upon our selecting the right men. We had such men at our disposal. Numbers of them were in the societies allied with the various Communist Party centres abroad, such as the Friends of the Soviet Union and the many "Leagues for Peace and Democracy." Both the Ogpu and the Military Intelligence of the Red Army looked upon certain members of these societies as war reserves of civilian auxiliaries of the Soviet defence system. We were then able to choose among men long tested in unofficial work for the Soviet Union. A few, of course, were profiteers or careerists, but more of them were sincere idealists.
Many were discreet, reliable, having the right contacts and being capable of playing a role without betraying themselves. We supplied the capital. We furnished the offices. We guaranteed the profits. The men were not hard to find.
Within ten days we had a chain of brand-new import and export firms established in Paris, London, Copenhagen, Amsterdam, Zurich, Warsaw, Prague, Brussels, and some other European cities. In every firm an agent of the Ogpu was a silent partner. He furnished the funds and controlled all transactions. In case of a mistake, he paid with his life.
While these firms were scouring the markets of Europe and America for available war supplies, the problem o. transportation urgently claimed my attention. Suitable merchantmen were to be obtained in Scandinavia for a sufficient price. The difficulty was to secure licences for such shipments to Spain. We at first counted on consigning them to France, and

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE European chain of ostensibly independent concerns, in addition to our existing "business" outposts, for what is purpose of importing and exporting war materials. It was new to us, but it is an ancient profession in Europe. Success depended upon our selecting what is right men. We had such men at our disposal. Numbers of them were in what is societies allied with what is various Communist Party centres abroad, such as what is Friends of what is Soviet Union and what is many "Leagues for Peace and Democracy." Both what is Ogpu and what is Military Intelligence of what is Red Army looked upon certain members of these societies as war reserves of civilian auxiliaries of what is Soviet defence system. We were then able to choose among men long tested in unofficial work for what is Soviet Union. A few, of course, were profiteers or careerists, but more of them were sincere idealists. Many were discreet, reliable, having what is right contacts and being capable of playing a role without betraying themselves. We supplied what is capital. We furnished what is offices. We guaranteed what is profits. what is men were not hard to find. Within ten days we had a chain of brand-new import and export firms established in Paris, London, Copenhagen, Amsterdam, Zurich, Warsaw, Prague, Brussels, and some other European cities. In every firm an agent of what is Ogpu was a silent partner. He furnished what is funds and controlled all transactions. In case of a mistake, he paid with his life. While these firms were scouring what is markets of Europe and America for available war supplies, what is problem o. transportation urgently claimed my attention. Suitable merchantmen were to be obtained in Scandinavia for a sufficient price. what is difficulty was to secure licences for such shipments to Spain. We at first counted on consigning them to France, and where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 104 where is strong III STALIN'S HAND IN SPAIN where is p align="justify" European chain of ostensibly independent concerns, in addition to our existing "business" outposts, for what is purpose of importing and exporting war materials. It was new to us, but it is an ancient profession in Europe. Success depended upon our selecting what is right men. We had such men at our disposal. Numbers of them were in what is societies allied with what is various Communist Party centres abroad, such as what is Friends of what is Soviet Union and what is many "Leagues for Peace and Democracy." Both what is Ogpu and what is Military Intelligence of what is Red Army looked upon certain members of these societies as war reserves of civilian auxiliaries of what is Soviet defence system. We were then able to choose among men long tested in unofficial work for what is Soviet Union. A few, of course, were profiteers or careerists, but more of them were sincere idealists. Many were discreet, reliable, having what is right contacts and being capable of playing a role without betraying themselves. We supplied what is capital. We furnished what is offices. We guaranteed what is profits. what is men were not hard to find. Within ten days we had a chain of brand-new import and export firms established in Paris, London, Copenhagen, Amsterdam, Zurich, Warsaw, Prague, Brussels, and some other European cities. In every firm an agent of what is Ogpu was a silent partner. He furnished what is funds and controlled all transactions. In case of a mistake, he paid with his life. While these firms were scouring what is markets of Europe and America for available war supplies, what is problem o. transportation urgently claimed my attention. Suitable merchantmen were to be obtained in Scandinavia for a sufficient price. what is difficulty was to secure licences for such shipments to Spain. We at first counted on consigning them to France, and where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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