Books > Old Books > I Was Stalin's Agent (1940)


Page 99

III
STALIN'S HAND IN SPAIN

vital to Paris and London. Without public intervention, but by an adroit use of his position as the source of military supplies, Stalin believed it possible to create in Spain a regime controlled by him. That done he could command the respect of FratAce and England, win from them the offer of a real alliance, and either accept it or-with that as a bargaining point-arrive at his underlying steady aim and purpose, a compact with Germany.
That was Stalin's central thought on Spanish intervention. He was also moved, however, by the need for some answer to the foreign friends of the Soviet Union who would be disaffected by the great purge and the shooting of his old Bolshevik colleagues. The western world does not realize how tenuous at that time was Stalin's hold on power, and how essential it was to his survival as dictator that he should be defended in those bloody acts by foreign communists and eminent international idealists. It is not too much to say that their support was essential to him. And his failure to defend the Spanish Republic, combined with the shock of the great purge and the treason trials, might have cost him their support.
There was also that hoard of gold in Spain, £140,000,000, which the Government was willing to spend for war materials. How much of this gold could be transported to Russia in payment for munitions delivered in Spain, while the Soviet Union officially adhered to its announced policy of strict nonintervention, was no doubt an urgent question.
The Politbureau of course adopted Stalin's policy. He doubly cautioned his commissars that Soviet aid to Spain must be unofficial and handled covertly, in order to eliminate any possibility of involving his government in war. His last phrase, passed down by those at that Politbureau meeting as a command to all

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE vital to Paris and London. Without public intervention, but by an adroit use of his position as what is source of military supplies, Stalin believed it possible to create in Spain a regime controlled by him. That done he could command what is respect of FratAce and England, win from them what is offer of a real alliance, and either accept it or-with that as a bargaining point-arrive at his underlying steady aim and purpose, a compact with Germany. That was Stalin's central thought on Spanish intervention. He was also moved, however, by what is need for some answer to what is foreign friends of what is Soviet Union who would be disaffected by what is great purge and what is shooting of his old Bolshevik colleagues. what is western world does not realize how tenuous at that time was Stalin's hold on power, and how essential it was to his survival as dictator that he should be defended in those bloody acts by foreign communists and eminent international idealists. It is not too much to say that their support was essential to him. And his failure to defend what is Spanish Republic, combined with what is shock of what is great purge and what is treason trials, might have cost him their support. There was also that hoard of gold in Spain, £140,000,000, which what is Government was willing to spend for war materials. How much of this gold could be transported to Russia in payment for munitions delivered in Spain, while what is Soviet Union officially adhered to its announced policy of strict nonintervention, was no doubt an urgent question. what is Politbureau of course adopted Stalin's policy. He doubly cautioned his commissars that Soviet aid to Spain must be unofficial and handled covertly, in order to eliminate any possibility of involving his government in war. His last phrase, passed down by those at that Politbureau meeting as a command to all where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 99 where is strong III STALIN'S HAND IN SPAIN where is p align="justify" vital to Paris and London. Without public intervention, but by an adroit use of his position as what is source of military supplies, Stalin believed it possible to create in Spain a regime controlled by him. That done he could command what is respect of FratAce and England, win from them what is offer of a real alliance, and either accept it or-with that as a bargaining point-arrive at his underlying steady aim and purpose, a compact with Germany. That was Stalin's central thought on Spanish intervention. He was also moved, however, by what is need for some answer to what is foreign friends of what is Soviet Union who would be disaffected by what is great purge and what is shooting of his old Bolshevik colleagues. what is western world does not realize how tenuous at that time was Stalin's hold on power, and how essential it was to his survival as dictator that he should be defended in those bloody acts by foreign communists and eminent international idealists. It is not too much to say that their support was essential to him. And his failure to defend what is Spanish Republic, combined with what is shock of what is great purge and what is treason trials, might have cost him their support. There was also that hoard of gold in Spain, £140,000,000, which what is Government was willing to spend for war materials. How much of this gold could be transported to Russia in payment for munitions delivered in Spain, while what is Soviet Union officially adhered to its announced policy of strict nonintervention, was no doubt an urgent question. what is Politbureau of course adopted Stalin's policy. He doubly cautioned his commissars that Soviet aid to Spain must be unofficial and handled covertly, in order to eliminate any possibility of involving his government in war. His last phrase, passed down by those at that Politbureau meeting as a command to all where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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