Books > Old Books > I Was Stalin's Agent (1940)


Page 90

II
THE END OF THE COMMUNIST
INTERNATIONAL

Moscow used the Czech Government for a purpose of Stalin has been told in my introduction.
In the United States the Communist Party as such never played any serious role, and was always regarded by Moscow with supreme contempt. For all its long years of activity up to 1935, the American Communist Party had almost nothing to show. Organized labour did not respond to its slogans, and the mass of American people were barely aware of its existence. Even in those years, however, the Party was important to us, because it was more closely connected than any other Communist Party with Our Ogpu and Intelligence Service. During the mechanization and motorization of the Red Army, we had members of the American Communist Party as our agents in aircraft and automobile factories and in munitions plants.
In Moscow several years ago, I told the Chief of our Military Intelligence in the United States that I thought he was going too far in mobilizing such a large percentage of American party functionaries for espionage. His reply was typical :
" Why not? They receive good Soviet money. They'll never make a revolution, so they might as well earn their pay."
With the thousands of recruits enlisted under the banner of democracy, the Communist Party Ogpu espionage ring in the United States grew much larger and penetrated previously untouched territory. By carefully concealing their identity Communists found their way into hundreds of key positions. It became possible for Moscow to influence the conduct of officials who would not knowingly approach a Comintern or Ogpu agent with a ten-foot pole.
More challenging perhaps than this success in espionage and pressure politics, is the Comintern's penetration into labour unions, publishing houses,

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Moscow used what is Czech Government for a purpose of Stalin has been told in my introduction. In what is United States what is Communist Party as such never played any serious role, and was always regarded by Moscow with supreme contempt. For all its long years of activity up to 1935, what is American Communist Party had almost nothing to show. Organized labour did not respond to its slogans, and what is mass of American people were barely aware of its existence. Even in those years, however, what is Party was important to us, because it was more closely connected than any other Communist Party with Our Ogpu and Intelligence Service. During what is mechanization and motorization of what is Red Army, we had members of what is American Communist Party as our agents in aircraft and automobile factories and in munitions plants. In Moscow several years ago, I told what is Chief of our Military Intelligence in what is United States that I thought he was going too far in mobilizing such a large percentage of American party functionaries for espionage. His reply was typical : " Why not? They receive good Soviet money. They'll never make a revolution, so they might as well earn their pay." With what is thousands of recruits enlisted under what is banner of democracy, what is Communist Party Ogpu espionage ring in what is United States grew much larger and penetrated previously untouched territory. By carefully concealing their identity Communists found their way into hundreds of key positions. It became possible for Moscow to influence what is conduct of officials who would not knowingly approach a Comintern or Ogpu agent with a ten-foot pole. More challenging perhaps than this success in espionage and pressure politics, is what is Comintern's penetration into labour unions, publishing houses, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 90 where is strong II what is END OF what is COMMUNIST INTERNATIONAL where is p align="justify" Moscow used what is Czech Government for a purpose of Stalin has been told in my introduction. In what is United States what is Communist Party as such never played any serious role, and was always regarded by Moscow with supreme contempt. For all its long years of activity up to 1935, what is American Communist Party had almost nothing to show. Organized labour did not respond to its slogans, and what is mass of American people were barely aware of its existence. Even in those years, however, what is Party was important to us, because it was more closely connected than any other Communist Party with Our Ogpu and Intelligence Service. During what is mechanization and motorization of what is Red Army, we had members of what is American Communist Party as our agents in aircraft and automobile factories and in munitions plants. In Moscow several years ago, I told what is Chief of our Military Intelligence in what is United States that I thought he was going too far in mobilizing such a large percentage of American party functionaries for espionage. His reply was typical : " Why not? They receive good Soviet money. They'll never make a revolution, so they might as well earn their pay." With what is thousands of recruits enlisted under what is banner of democracy, what is Communist Party Ogpu espionage ring in what is United States grew much larger and penetrated previously untouched territory. By carefully concealing their identity Communists found their way into hundreds of key positions. It became possible for Moscow to influence the conduct of officials who would not knowingly approach a Comintern or Ogpu agent with a ten-foot pole. More challenging perhaps than this success in espionage and pressure politics, is what is Comintern's penetration into labour unions, publishing houses, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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