Books > Old Books > I Was Stalin's Agent (1940)


Page 86

II
THE END OF THE COMMUNIST
INTERNATIONAL

representatives of their respective parties, have always constituted a glaring anomaly in Soviet life. The Communist Parties do not of course send their firstrank leaders to reside in Moscow. Men like Pollitt, Browder and Thorez come only when summoned to an important conference or congress. But each party has its resident consuls in Moscow too, differing from a regular diplomatic corps in that their salaries are not paid by those who sent them. Regarded with contempt by the members of the Bolshevik Political Bureau, and especially by Stalin himself, they nevertheless shine-or did shine until recently-as social lights in Moscow.
During the famine that accompanied forcible collectivization in I932-3, when the average Soviet employee had to get along on bread and dried fish, a co-operative was created for the exclusive use of these foreigners, where they could purchase, at moderate prices, products that no money could buy elsewhere. The Hotel Lux became a symbol of social injustice, and the average Muscovite, if asked who lived in comfort in Moscow, would invariably reply :
" The diplomatic corps and the foreigners in the Hotel Lux."
The handful of Russian writers, actors and actresses who occasionally mixed socially with the Comintern people were forced to lick the plates of this foreign aristocracv. The Russians would come to them and beg for such small conveniences as razor blades, needles, lipstick, fountain pens or a pound of coffee.
To the Ogpu the international collection living at the Hotel Lux at the government's expense was, and is always, subject to suspicion. This papier-mache world of the "proletarian revolution" is always buzzing with intrigue and mutual recriminations, each foreign Communist accusing the other of insufficient loyalty

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE representatives of their respective parties, have always constituted a glaring anomaly in Soviet life. what is Communist Parties do not of course send their firstrank leaders to reside in Moscow. Men like Pollitt, Browder and Thorez come only when summoned to an important conference or congress. But each party has its resident consuls in Moscow too, differing from a regular diplomatic corps in that their salaries are not paid by those who sent them. Regarded with contempt by what is members of what is Bolshevik Political Bureau, and especially by Stalin himself, they nevertheless shine-or did shine until recently-as social lights in Moscow. During what is famine that accompanied forcible collectivization in I932-3, when what is average Soviet employee had to get along on bread and dried fish, a co-operative was created for what is exclusive use of these foreigners, where they could purchase, at moderate prices, products that no money could buy elsewhere. what is Hotel Lux became a symbol of social injustice, and what is average Muscovite, if asked who lived in comfort in Moscow, would invariably reply : " what is diplomatic corps and what is foreigners in what is Hotel Lux." what is handful of Russian writers, actors and actresses who occasionally mixed socially with what is Comintern people were forced to lick what is plates of this foreign aristocracv. what is Russians would come to them and beg for such small conveniences as razor blades, needles, lipstick, fountain pens or a pound of coffee. To what is Ogpu what is international collection living at what is Hotel Lux at what is government's expense was, and is always, subject to suspicion. This papier-mache world of what is "proletarian revolution" is always buzzing with intrigue and mutual recriminations, each foreign Communist accusing what is other of insufficient loyalty where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 86 where is strong II what is END OF what is COMMUNIST INTERNATIONAL where is p align="justify" representatives of their respective parties, have always constituted a glaring anomaly in Soviet life. what is Communist Parties do not of course send their firstrank leaders to reside in Moscow. Men like Pollitt, Browder and Thorez come only when summoned to an important conference or congress. But each party has its resident consuls in Moscow too, differing from a regular diplomatic corps in that their salaries are not paid by those who sent them. Regarded with contempt by what is members of what is Bolshevik Political Bureau, and especially by Stalin himself, they nevertheless shine-or did shine until recently-as social lights in Moscow. During what is famine that accompanied forcible collectivization in I932-3, when what is average Soviet employee had to get along on bread and dried fish, a co-operative was created for what is exclusive use of these foreigners, where they could purchase, at moderate prices, products that no money could buy elsewhere. what is Hotel Lux became a symbol of social injustice, and what is average Muscovite, if asked who lived in comfort in Moscow, would invariably reply : " what is diplomatic corps and what is foreigners in what is Hotel Lux." what is handful of Russian writers, actors and actresses who occasionally mixed socially with what is Comintern people were forced to lick the plates of this foreign aristocracv. what is Russians would come to them and beg for such small conveniences as razor blades, needles, lipstick, fountain pens or a pound of coffee. To what is Ogpu what is international collection living at what is Hotel Lux at what is government's expense was, and is always, subject to suspicion. This papier-mache world of what is "proletarian revolution" is always buzzing with intrigue and mutual recriminations, each foreign Communist accusing what is other of insufficient loyalty where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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