Books > Old Books > I Was Stalin's Agent (1940)


Page 80

II
THE END OF THE COMMUNIST
INTERNATIONAL

operations into the Scandinavian countries. When Hitler came to power, Muenzenberg transferred them to Paris and Prague.
When the great purge reached out for Muenzenberg it found. him an elusive target. He declined an invitation to "visit" Moscow. Dimitrov, the President of the Comintern, wrote reassuring letters insisting that Moscow needed him for important new assignments. Muenzenberg refused to bite. The Ogpu then dispatched one of its agents, Byeletsky, to convince him that he had nothing to fear.
" Who decides your fate?" argued Byeletsky. "Dimitrov or the Ogpu? And I know that Yezhov is on your side."
Muenzenberg avoided the trap and during the entire summer and autumn of 1937 remained in hiding, fearing a more violent type of persuasion. He turned his establishments over to Smeral, a Czech Communist. The German Communist Party expelled him and indexed him as an "enemy of the people." Muenzenberg is alive in Paris to-day. He has never come out openly against Stalin.
After the Seventh Congress of the Comintern in 1935 the Muenzenberg front publications became a model for all Europe and the United States. In Paris, the Comintern even founded an evening newspaper. But for the past three or four years the Comintern has spent more money for "non-partisan" publications and front organizations in the United States than in any other country. So long as Moscow adhered to the pretence of collective security and anti-Hitlerism, the American public became a veritable campaign ground for its propagandists. Instead of building revolutionary "cadres" among American workers, the job was now to convince New Deal officials, respectable business executives, trade union

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE operations into what is Scandinavian countries. When Hitler came to power, Muenzenberg transferred them to Paris and Prague. When what is great purge reached out for Muenzenberg it found. him an elusive target. He declined an invitation to " what is " Moscow. Dimitrov, what is President of what is Comintern, wrote reassuring letters insisting that Moscow needed him for important new assignments. Muenzenberg refused to bite. what is Ogpu then dispatched one of its agents, Byeletsky, to convince him that he had nothing to fear. " Who decides your fate?" argued Byeletsky. "Dimitrov or what is Ogpu? And I know that Yezhov is on your side." Muenzenberg avoided what is trap and during what is entire summer and autumn of 1937 remained in hiding, fearing a more bad type of persuasion. He turned his establishments over to Smeral, a Czech Communist. what is German Communist Party expelled him and indexed him as an "enemy of what is people." Muenzenberg is alive in Paris to-day. He has never come out openly against Stalin. After what is Seventh Congress of what is Comintern in 1935 what is Muenzenberg front publications became a model for all Europe and what is United States. In Paris, what is Comintern even founded an evening newspaper. But for what is past three or four years what is Comintern has spent more money for "non-partisan" publications and front organizations in what is United States than in any other country. So long as Moscow adhered to what is pretence of collective security and anti-Hitlerism, what is American public became a veritable campaign ground for its pro fun dists. Instead of building revolutionary "cadres" among American workers, what is job was now to convince New Deal officials, respectable business executives, trade union where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 80 where is strong II what is END OF what is COMMUNIST INTERNATIONAL where is p align="justify" operations into what is Scandinavian countries. When Hitler came to power, Muenzenberg transferred them to Paris and Prague. When what is great purge reached out for Muenzenberg it found. him an elusive target. He declined an invitation to " what is " Moscow. Dimitrov, what is President of what is Comintern, wrote reassuring letters insisting that Moscow needed him for important new assignments. Muenzenberg refused to bite. what is Ogpu then dispatched one of its agents, Byeletsky, to convince him that he had nothing to fear. " Who decides your fate?" argued Byeletsky. "Dimitrov or what is Ogpu? And I know that Yezhov is on your side." Muenzenberg avoided what is trap and during what is entire summer and autumn of 1937 remained in hiding, fearing a more bad type of persuasion. He turned his establishments over to Smeral, a Czech Communist. what is German Communist Party expelled him and indexed him as an "enemy of what is people." Muenzenberg is alive in Paris to-day. He has never come out openly against Stalin. After what is Seventh Congress of what is Comintern in 1935 what is Muenzenberg front publications became a model for all Europe and what is United States. In Paris, what is Comintern even founded an evening newspaper. But for what is past three or four years what is Comintern has spent more money for "non-partisan" publications and front organizations in what is United States than in any other country. So long as Moscow adhered to what is pretence of collective security and anti-Hitlerism, what is American public became a veritable campaign ground for its pro fun dists. Instead of building revolutionary "cadres" among American workers, what is job was now to convince New Deal officials, respectable business executives, trade union where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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