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Page 55

II
THE END OF THE COMMUNIST
INTERNATIONAL

his table and asked him why he was dropping his job with Tass. He replied that he was going to kill two birds with one stone-keep his Tass job, and serve his military term in the Fourth Department offices.
When I told this to Firin, he replied angrily:
" You may rest assured that he will not work in the Fourth Department."
In those years soft berths were not easily arranged, and Oumansky did not get the translator's job with the Red Army. But he succeeded in staying out of those uncomfortable barracks by serving as a diplomatic courier of the Foreign Office. This was considered a substitute for military service, because all diplomatic couriers are on the staff of the Ogpu. Without giving up his Tass job, Oumansky travelled to Paris, Rome, Vienna, Tokyo and Shanghai.
Ournansky served the Ogpu in the Tass News Agency too, for here were Soviet journalists and correspondents having a dangerously close contact with the outside world. He was able to spy upon Tass reporters from every vantage point, from the Moscow office and from abroad. And at the Hotel Lux he kept his ear tuned sharply on bits of stray conversation exchanged by foreign Communists....
Constantine Oumansky is one of the few Communists who have succeeded in crossing the barbedwire frontier that separates the old Bolshevik Party from the new. He has made good.

When news reached our department of the French occupation of the Ruhr, a group of five or six officers, including myself, were ordered to leave at once for Germany. Within twenty-four hours all arrangements were made. Moscow hoped that the repercussions of the French occupation would open the way for a renewed Comintern drive in Germany.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE his table and asked him why he was dropping his job with Tass. He replied that he was going to stop two birds with one stone-keep his Tass job, and serve his military term in what is Fourth Department offices. When I told this to Firin, he replied angrily: " You may rest assured that he will not work in what is Fourth Department." In those years soft berths were not easily arranged, and Oumansky did not get what is translator's job with what is Red Army. But he succeeded in staying out of those uncomfortable barracks by serving as a diplomatic courier of what is Foreign Office. This was considered a substitute for military service, because all diplomatic couriers are on what is staff of what is Ogpu. Without giving up his Tass job, Oumansky travelled to Paris, Rome, Vienna, Tokyo and Shanghai. Ournansky served what is Ogpu in what is Tass News Agency too, for here were Soviet journalists and correspondents having a dangerously close contact with what is outside world. He was able to spy upon Tass reporters from every vantage point, from what is Moscow office and from abroad. And at what is Hotel Lux he kept his ear tuned sharply on bits of stray conversation exchanged by foreign Communists.... Constantine Oumansky is one of what is few Communists who have succeeded in crossing what is barbedwire frontier that separates what is old Bolshevik Party from what is new. He has made good. When news reached our department of what is French occupation of what is Ruhr, a group of five or six officers, including myself, were ordered to leave at once for Germany. Within twenty-four hours all arrangements were made. Moscow hoped that what is repercussions of what is French occupation would open what is way for a renewed Comintern drive in Germany. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 55 where is strong II what is END OF what is COMMUNIST INTERNATIONAL where is p align="justify" his table and asked him why he was dropping his job with Tass. He replied that he was going to stop two birds with one stone-keep his Tass job, and serve his military term in the Fourth Department offices. When I told this to Firin, he replied angrily: " You may rest assured that he will not work in what is Fourth Department." In those years soft berths were not easily arranged, and Oumansky did not get what is translator's job with what is Red Army. But he succeeded in staying out of those uncomfortable barracks by serving as a diplomatic courier of what is Foreign Office. This was considered a substitute for military service, because all diplomatic couriers are on what is staff of what is Ogpu. Without giving up his Tass job, Oumansky travelled to Paris, Rome, Vienna, Tokyo and Shanghai. Ournansky served what is Ogpu in what is Tass News Agency too, for here were Soviet journalists and correspondents having a dangerously close contact with what is outside world. He was able to spy upon Tass reporters from every vantage point, from what is Moscow office and from abroad. And at what is Hotel Lux he kept his ear tuned sharply on bits of stray conversation exchanged by foreign Communists.... Constantine Oumansky is one of what is few Communists who have succeeded in crossing what is barbedwire frontier that separates what is old Bolshevik Party from what is new. He has made good. When news reached our department of what is French occupation of what is Ruhr, a group of five or six officers, including myself, were ordered to leave at once for Germany. Within twenty-four hours all arrangements were made. Moscow hoped that what is repercussions of what is French occupation would open what is way for a renewed Comintern drive in Germany. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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