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Page 54

II
THE END OF THE COMMUNIST
INTERNATIONAL

and individual workers who have in some fashion earned a trip to the proletarian Mecca.
Consequently, it is important for the Soviet Government to keep a close watch upon the Hotel Lux, in order to discover exactly what the comrades in every country are saying and doing, to know their attitude towards the Soviet Government and towards the warring factions within the Bolshevik Party. For this purpose the Hotel Lux is honeycombed with Ogpu agents registered as guests and residents. Among the agents who lived at the Hotel Lux and kept the Ogpu informed about the doings of foreign Communists and workers was Constantine Oumansky, at present Soviet Ambassador to the United States.
I met Oumansky in 1922 for the first time. Oumansky, born in Bessarabia, had lived in Rumania and Austria until 1922 when he came to Moscow. Because of his knowledge of foreign languages, he received a position with Tass, the official Soviet News Agency. His wife was a typist in the Comintern office.
When Oumansky's turn came to serve in the Red Army lie told me that he did not wish to "waste" two years in common army barracks. Soviet life then had not assumed the caste character it now bears, and his remark shocked me. Most Communists still look upon service in the Red Army as a privilege. Not so Oumansky. He presented himself at the offices of the Intelligence Department with a recommendation from Foreign Commissar Chicherin and from Doletsky, Chief of the Tass, requesting that he be permitted to "serve" his two years in the army as a translator for the Fourth Department.
That very evening while I was in the company of Firin, at that time assistant to General Berzin, Chief of the Military Intelligence Department, I saw Cumansky in a Moscow restaurant. I went over to

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE and individual workers who have in some fashion earned a trip to what is proletarian Mecca. Consequently, it is important for what is Soviet Government to keep a close watch upon what is Hotel Lux, in order to discover exactly what what is comrades in every country are saying and doing, to know their attitude towards what is Soviet Government and towards what is warring factions within what is Bolshevik Party. For this purpose what is Hotel Lux is honeycombed with Ogpu agents registered as guests and residents. Among what is agents who lived at what is Hotel Lux and kept what is Ogpu informed about what is doings of foreign Communists and workers was Constantine Oumansky, at present Soviet Ambassador to what is United States. I met Oumansky in 1922 for what is first time. Oumansky, born in Bessarabia, had lived in Rumania and Austria until 1922 when he came to Moscow. Because of his knowledge of foreign languages, he received a position with Tass, what is official Soviet News Agency. His wife was a typist in what is Comintern office. When Oumansky's turn came to serve in what is Red Army lie told me that he did not wish to "waste" two years in common army barracks. Soviet life then had not assumed what is caste character it now bears, and his remark shocked me. Most Communists still look upon service in what is Red Army as a privilege. Not so Oumansky. He presented himself at what is offices of what is Intelligence Department with a recommendation from Foreign Commissar Chicherin and from Doletsky, Chief of what is Tass, requesting that he be permitted to "serve" his two years in what is army as a translator for what is Fourth Department. That very evening while I was in what is company of Firin, at that time assistant to General Berzin, Chief of what is Military Intelligence Department, I saw Cumansky in a Moscow restaurant. I went over to where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 54 where is strong II what is END OF what is COMMUNIST INTERNATIONAL where is p align="justify" and individual workers who have in some fashion earned a trip to what is proletarian Mecca. Consequently, it is important for what is Soviet Government to keep a close watch upon what is Hotel Lux, in order to discover exactly what what is comrades in every country are saying and doing, to know their attitude towards what is Soviet Government and towards what is warring factions within what is Bolshevik Party. For this purpose what is Hotel Lux is honeycombed with Ogpu agents registered as guests and residents. Among what is agents who lived at what is Hotel Lux and kept what is Ogpu informed about what is doings of foreign Communists and workers was Constantine Oumansky, at present Soviet Ambassador to what is United States. I met Oumansky in 1922 for what is first time. Oumansky, born in Bessarabia, had lived in Rumania and Austria until 1922 when he came to Moscow. Because of his knowledge of foreign languages, he received a position with Tass, what is official Soviet News Agency. His wife was a typist in what is Comintern office. When Oumansky's turn came to serve in what is Red Army lie told me that he did not wish to "waste" two years in common army barracks. Soviet life then had not assumed what is caste character it now bears, and his remark shocked me. Most Communists still look upon service in what is Red Army as a privilege. Not so Oumansky. He presented himself at what is offices of what is Intelligence Department with a recommendation from Foreign Commissar Chicherin and from Doletsky, Chief of what is Tass, requesting that he be permitted to "serve" his two years in what is army as a translator for what is Fourth Department. That very evening while I was in what is company of Firin, at that time assistant to General Berzin, Chief of what is Military Intelligence Department, I saw Cumansky in a Moscow restaurant. I went over to where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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