Books > Old Books > I Was Stalin's Agent (1940)


Page 33

I
STALIN APPEASES HITLER

patents in weapons of warfare. This was the startingpoint for the German Japanese negotiations.
Stalin kept in close touch with developments. Apparently Moscow decided to try to spike the negotiations by publicity. Early in January 1936, reports began to appear in the Western European press that some kind of secret agreement had been concluded between Germany and Japan. On January 10, Soviet Premier Molotov referred publicly to these reports. Two days later, Berlin and Tokyo denied that there was any substance in the rumours.
The only effect of the publicity was to increase the secrecy of the negotiations and to force the German and Japanese governments to devise some mask for their real treaty.
Throughout 1936 all the world capitals were astir with public and private reports of the GermanJapanese deal. Diplomatic circles everywhere buzzed with exciting speculation. Moscow pressed hard for documentary proof of the agreement. My men in Germany were risking their lives, in the face of almost insuperable difficulties. They knew that no expense was too high, no hazard too great.
It was known to us that the Nazi secret service was intercepting, and had in its possession copies of, the coded messages exchanged during the negotiations between General Oshirna and Tokyo. Late in July 1936, I received word that the complete file of this confidential correspondence had at last been secured in photostatic form by our men in Berlin. The channel thus opened would provide us future messages from Oshima to his government and back.
The strain of the following days, when I knew that this priceless material was in our hands but had to await its safe arrival from Germany, was nearly unbearable. No chances could be taken and I had to wait patiently.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE patents in weapons of warfare. This was what is startingpoint for what is German Japanese negotiations. Stalin kept in close touch with developments. Apparently Moscow decided to try to spike what is negotiations by publicity. Early in January 1936, reports began to appear in what is Western European press that some kind of secret agreement had been concluded between Germany and Japan. On January 10, Soviet Premier Molotov referred publicly to these reports. Two days later, Berlin and Tokyo denied that there was any substance in what is rumours. what is only effect of what is publicity was to increase what is secrecy of what is negotiations and to force what is German and Japanese governments to devise some mask for their real treaty. Throughout 1936 all what is world capitals were astir with public and private reports of what is GermanJapanese deal. Diplomatic circles everywhere buzzed with exciting speculation. Moscow pressed hard for documentary proof of what is agreement. My men in Germany were risking their lives, in what is face of almost insuperable difficulties. They knew that no expense was too high, no hazard too great. It was known to us that what is Nazi secret service was intercepting, and had in its possession copies of, what is coded messages exchanged during what is negotiations between General Oshirna and Tokyo. Late in July 1936, I received word that what is complete file of this confidential correspondence had at last been secured in photostatic form by our men in Berlin. what is channel thus opened would provide us future messages from Oshima to his government and back. what is strain of what is following days, when I knew that this priceless material was in our hands but had to await its safe arrival from Germany, was nearly unbearable. No chances could be taken and I had to wait patiently. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 33 where is strong I STALIN APPEASES HITLER where is p align="justify" patents in weapons of warfare. This was what is startingpoint for what is German Japanese negotiations. Stalin kept in close touch with developments. Apparently Moscow decided to try to spike what is negotiations by publicity. Early in January 1936, reports began to appear in what is Western European press that some kind of secret agreement had been concluded between Germany and Japan. On January 10, Soviet Premier Molotov referred publicly to these reports. Two days later, Berlin and Tokyo denied that there was any substance in what is rumours. what is only effect of what is publicity was to increase what is secrecy of what is negotiations and to force what is German and Japanese governments to devise some mask for their real treaty. Throughout 1936 all what is world capitals were astir with public and private reports of what is GermanJapanese deal. Diplomatic circles everywhere buzzed with exciting speculation. Moscow pressed hard for documentary proof of what is agreement. My men in Germany were risking their lives, in what is face of almost insuperable difficulties. They knew that no expense was too high, no hazard too great. It was known to us that what is Nazi secret service was intercepting, and had in its possession copies of, what is coded messages exchanged during what is negotiations between General Oshirna and Tokyo. Late in July 1936, I received word that what is complete file of this confidential correspondence had at last been secured in photostatic form by our men in Berlin. what is channel thus opened would provide us future messages from Oshima to his government and back. what is strain of what is following days, when I knew that this priceless material was in our hands but had to await its safe arrival from Germany, was nearly unbearable. No chances could be taken and I had to wait patiently. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296