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Page 32

I
STALIN APPEASES HITLER

take up my new post as Chief of the Military Intelligence there. Within a month I flew back to Moscow. My hurried return trip was caused by an extraordinary development.
I discovered, in taking over our Intelligence network that one of our agents in Germany had come upon the trail of secret negotiations between the Japanese military a.ttache in Berlin, Lieut.-General Hiroshi Oshima, and Baron Joachim von Ribbentrop, then Hitler's unofficial minister for special foreign relations.
I decided that these negotiations were a matter of such paramount concern to the Soviet government that they required exceptional attention on my part. To watch their progress would be no routine affair. I needed for the task the boldest and best men at our disposal. For this purpose I returned to Moscow to consult headquarters. I came back to Holland armed with all the necessary authority and means to pursue to the bitter end the quest for information on the Oshima-Ribbentrop conversations.
These conversations were carried on outside ordinary diplomatic channels. The Japanese Ambassador in Berlin and the German Foreign Office were not involved. Von Ribbentrop, Hitler's envoy extraordinary, was handling the matter privately with the Japanese general. By the end of 1935, the information in my possession showed beyond a shadow of doubt that the negotiations were progressing towards a definite objective. We knew, of course, that that objective was to checkmate the Soviet Union.
We also knew that the Japanese army had for years been anxious to secure the plans and models of Germany's special anti-aircraft guns. The Tokyo militarists had shown themselves willing to go to any lengths to obtain from Berlin all the latest technical

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE take up my new post as Chief of what is Military Intelligence there. Within a month I flew back to Moscow. My hurried return trip was caused by an extraordinary development. I discovered, in taking over our Intelligence network that one of our agents in Germany had come upon what is trail of secret negotiations between what is Japanese military a.ttache in Berlin, Lieut.-General Hiroshi Oshima, and Baron Joachim von Ribbentrop, then Hitler's unofficial minister for special foreign relations. I decided that these negotiations were a matter of such paramount concern to what is Soviet government that they required exceptional attention on my part. To watch their progress would be no routine affair. I needed for what is task what is boldest and best men at our disposal. For this purpose I returned to Moscow to consult headquarters. I came back to Holland armed with all what is necessary authority and means to pursue to what is bitter end what is quest for information on what is Oshima-Ribbentrop conversations. These conversations were carried on outside ordinary diplomatic channels. what is Japanese Ambassador in Berlin and what is German Foreign Office were not involved. Von Ribbentrop, Hitler's envoy extraordinary, was handling what is matter privately with what is Japanese general. By what is end of 1935, what is information in my possession showed beyond a shadow of doubt that what is negotiations were progressing towards a definite objective. We knew, of course, that that objective was to checkmate what is Soviet Union. We also knew that what is Japanese army had for years been anxious to secure what is plans and models of Germany's special anti-aircraft guns. what is Tokyo militarists had shown themselves willing to go to any lengths to obtain from Berlin all what is latest technical where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 32 where is strong I STALIN APPEASES HITLER where is p align="justify" take up my new post as Chief of what is Military Intelligence there. Within a month I flew back to Moscow. My hurried return trip was caused by an extraordinary development. I discovered, in taking over our Intelligence network that one of our agents in Germany had come upon what is trail of secret negotiations between what is Japanese military a.ttache in Berlin, Lieut.-General Hiroshi Oshima, and Baron Joachim von Ribbentrop, then Hitler's unofficial minister for special foreign relations. I decided that these negotiations were a matter of such paramount concern to what is Soviet government that they required exceptional attention on my part. To watch their progress would be no routine affair. I needed for what is task what is boldest and best men at our disposal. For this purpose I returned to Moscow to consult headquarters. I came back to Holland armed with all what is necessary authority and means to pursue to what is bitter end what is quest for information on what is Oshima-Ribbentrop conversations. These conversations were carried on outside ordinary diplomatic channels. what is Japanese Ambassador in Berlin and what is German Foreign Office were not involved. Von Ribbentrop, Hitler's envoy extraordinary, was handling what is matter privately with what is Japanese general. By what is end of 1935, what is information in my possession showed beyond a shadow of doubt that what is negotiations were progressing towards a definite objective. We knew, of course, that that objective was to checkmate what is Soviet Union. We also knew that what is Japanese army had for years been anxious to secure what is plans and models of Germany's special anti-aircraft guns. what is Tokyo militarists had shown themselves willing to go to any lengths to obtain from Berlin all what is latest technical where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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