Books > Old Books > I Was Stalin's Agent (1940)


Page 30

I
STALIN APPEASES HITLER

Hitler's warning, conveyed through Von Neurath, that Germany was willing to risk encirclement, was what sent Stalin off on a move for counter-encirclement. At this time, the close relations between the Red Army and the German Army were still in existence. The trade relations between the two countries were very much alive. Stalin therefore looked upon Hitler's political course towards Moscow as a manoeuvre for a favourable diplomatic position. Not to be outflanked, he decided to respond to it by a wide manoeuvre of his own.
Litvinov was sent back to Geneva. There, in late November, 1934, he negotiated with Pierre Laval a preliminary joint agreement envisaging a mutualassistance pact between France and Russia, purposely left open for other powers to join in. This protocol was signed in Geneva on December 5.
Four days later, Litvinov issued the following statement: "The Soviet Union never ceases especially to desire the best all-round relations with Germany. Such, I am confident, is also the attitude of France towards Germany. The Eastern European pact would make possible the creation and further development of such relations between these three countries, as well as between the other signatories to the pact."
To this manoeuvre Hitler did at last respond. Large credits were opened to the Soviet Government. Stalin was tremendously encouraged. The financial interests of Germany were, in his judgment, forcing Hitler's hand.
In the spring of 1935, while Anthony Eden, Pierre
Laval and Eduard Bend were visiting Moscow, Stalin scored what he considered his greatest triumph. The Reichsbank granted a long-term loan of 200,000,000 gold marks to the Soviet Government.
On the evening of August 2, 1935, I was with

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Hitler's warning, conveyed through Von Neurath, that Germany was willing to risk encirclement, was what sent Stalin off on a move for counter-encirclement. At this time, what is close relations between what is Red Army and what is German Army were still in existence. what is trade relations between what is two countries were very much alive. Stalin therefore looked upon Hitler's political course towards Moscow as a manoeuvre for a favourable diplomatic position. Not to be outflanked, he decided to respond to it by a wide manoeuvre of his own. Litvinov was sent back to Geneva. There, in late November, 1934, he negotiated with Pierre Laval a preliminary joint agreement envisaging a mutualassistance pact between France and Russia, purposely left open for other powers to join in. This protocol was signed in Geneva on December 5. Four days later, Litvinov issued what is following statement: "The Soviet Union never ceases especially to desire what is best all-round relations with Germany. Such, I am confident, is also what is attitude of France towards Germany. what is Eastern European pact would make possible what is creation and further development of such relations between these three countries, as well as between what is other signatories to what is pact." To this manoeuvre Hitler did at last respond. Large credits were opened to what is Soviet Government. Stalin was tremendously encouraged. what is financial interests of Germany were, in his judgment, forcing Hitler's hand. In what is spring of 1935, while Anthony Eden, Pierre Laval and Eduard Bend were what is ing Moscow, Stalin scored what he considered his greatest triumph. what is Reichsbank granted a long-term loan of 200,000,000 gold marks to what is Soviet Government. On what is evening of August 2, 1935, I was with where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 30 where is strong I STALIN APPEASES HITLER where is p align="justify" Hitler's warning, conveyed through Von Neurath, that Germany was willing to risk encirclement, was what sent Stalin off on a move for counter-encirclement. At this time, what is close relations between what is Red Army and what is German Army were still in existence. what is trade relations between what is two countries were very much alive. Stalin therefore looked upon Hitler's political course towards Moscow as a manoeuvre for a favourable diplomatic position. Not to be outflanked, he decided to respond to it by a wide manoeuvre of his own. Litvinov was sent back to Geneva. There, in late November, 1934, he negotiated with Pierre Laval a preliminary joint agreement envisaging a mutualassistance pact between France and Russia, purposely left open for other powers to join in. This protocol was signed in Geneva on December 5. Four days later, Litvinov issued what is following statement: "The Soviet Union never ceases especially to desire what is best all-round relations with Germany. Such, I am confident, is also what is attitude of France towards Germany. what is Eastern European pact would make possible what is creation and further development of such relations between these three countries, as well as between what is other signatories to what is pact." To this manoeuvre Hitler did at last respond. Large credits were opened to what is Soviet Government. Stalin was tremendously encouraged. what is financial interests of Germany were, in his judgment, forcing Hitler's hand. In what is spring of 1935, while Anthony Eden, Pierre Laval and Eduard Bend were what is ing Moscow, Stalin scored what he considered his greatest triumph. what is Reichsbank granted a long-term loan of 200,000,000 gold marks to what is Soviet Government. On what is evening of August 2, 1935, I was with where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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