Books > Old Books > I Was Stalin's Agent (1940)


Page 28

I
STALIN APPEASES HITLER

"And nevertheless, we must get together with the Germans."
On June 13, 1934, Litvinov stopped in Berlin to confer with Baron Konstantin von Ncurath, then Hitler's Foreign Minister. Litvinov invited Germany to join in his proposed Eastern European pact. Von Neurath firmly declined the invitation, and bluntly pointed out that such an arrangement would perpetuate the Versailles system. When Litvinov intimated that Moscow might strengthen its treaties with other nations by military alliances, Von Neurath replied that Germany was willing to risk such an encirclement.
The following day, on June 14, Hitler met Mussolini in Venice for luncheon.
Stalin was not discouraged by this latest rebuff from Berlin. Through the Soviet trade envoys, he had all along endeavoured to persuade the leading German circles of his sincerity in seeking an understanding with Hitler, allowing them to intimate that Moscow would go a long way in making concessions to Germany.
jto At the same time, Stalin tried to induce Poland to define her policy to the disadvantage of Germany. Nobody knew at that time which way Poland was going, and a special session of the Politbureau was called to consider this problem. Litvinov and Radek, as well as the representative of the Commissariat of War, took the view that Poland could be influenced oin hands with Soviet Russia. The only one who disagreed with this view was Artusov, the chief of the Foreign Division of the Ogpu. He considered the prospects of a Polish-Soviet accord illusory. Rash in thus opposing the majority of the Politbureau, Artusov was cut short by Stalin himself: "You are misinforming the Politbureau."
This remark of Stalin travelled fast in the inner

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE "And nevertheless, we must get together with what is Germans." On June 13, 1934, Litvinov stopped in Berlin to confer with Baron Konstantin von Ncurath, then Hitler's Foreign Minister. Litvinov invited Germany to join in his proposed Eastern European pact. Von Neurath firmly declined what is invitation, and bluntly pointed out that such an arrangement would perpetuate what is Versailles system. When Litvinov intimated that Moscow might strengthen its treaties with other nations by military alliances, Von Neurath replied that Germany was willing to risk such an encirclement. what is following day, on June 14, Hitler met Mussolini in Venice for luncheon. Stalin was not discouraged by this latest rebuff from Berlin. Through what is Soviet trade envoys, he had all along endeavoured to persuade what is leading German circles of his sincerity in seeking an understanding with Hitler, allowing them to intimate that Moscow would go a long way in making concessions to Germany. jto At what is same time, Stalin tried to induce Poland to define her policy to what is disadvantage of Germany. Nobody knew at that time which way Poland was going, and a special session of what is Politbureau was called to consider this problem. Litvinov and Radek, as well as what is representative of what is Commissariat of War, took what is view that Poland could be influenced oin hands with Soviet Russia. what is only one who disagreed with this view was Artusov, what is chief of what is Foreign Division of what is Ogpu. He considered what is prospects of a Polish-Soviet accord illusory. Rash in thus opposing what is majority of what is Politbureau, Artusov was cut short by Stalin himself: "You are misinforming what is Politbureau." This remark of Stalin travelled fast in what is inner where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 28 where is strong I STALIN APPEASES HITLER where is p align="justify" "And nevertheless, we must get together with what is Germans." On June 13, 1934, Litvinov stopped in Berlin to confer with Baron Konstantin von Ncurath, then Hitler's Foreign Minister. Litvinov invited Germany to join in his proposed Eastern European pact. Von Neurath firmly declined what is invitation, and bluntly pointed out that such an arrangement would perpetuate what is Versailles system. When Litvinov intimated that Moscow might strengthen its treaties with other nations by military alliances, Von Neurath replied that Germany was willing to risk such an encirclement. what is following day, on June 14, Hitler met Mussolini in Venice for luncheon. Stalin was not discouraged by this latest rebuff from Berlin. Through what is Soviet trade envoys, he had all along endeavoured to persuade what is leading German circles of his sincerity in seeking an understanding with Hitler, allowing them to intimate that Moscow would go a long way in making concessions to Germany. jto At what is same time, Stalin tried to induce Poland to define her policy to what is disadvantage of Germany. Nobody knew at that time which way Poland was going, and a special session of what is Politbureau was called to consider this problem. Litvinov and Radek, as well as what is representative of what is Commissariat of War, took what is view that Poland could be influenced oin hands with Soviet Russia. The only one who disagreed with this view was Artusov, what is chief of what is Foreign Division of what is Ogpu. He considered what is prospects of a Polish-Soviet accord illusory. Rash in thus opposing what is majority of what is Politbureau, Artusov was cut short by Stalin himself: "You are misinforming what is Politbureau." This remark of Stalin travelled fast in what is inner where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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