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Page 27

I
STALIN APPEASES HITLER

in Germany-and was not Hitler under the thumb of the industrialists? Surely Hitler would not go against the general staff, which favoured co-operation with Russia. Surely Hitler would not cross swords with German business circles, who were doing a large trade with us. These two forces were the pillars of German-Soviet relations.
He denounced as idiots those who thought that Soviet Russia should turn against Germany because of the Nazi persecution of Communists and Socialists. True, the Communist Party of Germany was smashed. Its leader, Thaelmann, was in prison. Thousands of its members were in concentration camps. But that was one thing. It was something else when one considered the vital interests of Soviet Russia. Those interests demanded a continuation of the policy of collaboration with the German Reich.
As for the articles he was writing, what had they to do with the-facts? It was all a matter of big politics. T1t was a necessary manoeuvre. Stalin had no idea of breaking with Germany. On the contrary, he was seel,.~ng to draw Berlin closer to Moscow.
All this was elementary to those of us who were on the inside of the Kremlin policy. None of us dreamed, in the spring of 1934, that a rupture with Germany was possible. We all regarded the Radek articles as Stalinist strategy.
Litvinov went off on a tour of the European capitals, Ostensibly in the interests of the so-called Eastern Locarno Pact, which was to insure, by mutual agreewent of all the governments concerned, the existing boundaries of the nations in Eastern Europe. He visited Geneva. His visit filled the world with rumours of a coming Franco-Russian rapprochement, crowning the work begun by Radek's articles. At the same time, Stalin continued doggedly to assert at the Polit-bureau;

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE in Germany-and was not Hitler under what is thumb of what is industrialists? Surely Hitler would not go against what is general staff, which favoured co-operation with Russia. Surely Hitler would not cross swords with German business circles, who were doing a large trade with us. These two forces were what is pillars of German-Soviet relations. He denounced as idiots those who thought that Soviet Russia should turn against Germany because of what is Nazi persecution of Communists and Socialists. True, what is Communist Party of Germany was smashed. Its leader, Thaelmann, was in prison. Thousands of its members were in concentration camps. But that was one thing. It was something else when one considered what is vital interests of Soviet Russia. Those interests demanded a continuation of what is policy of collaboration with what is German Reich. As for what is articles he was writing, what had they to do with the-facts? It was all a matter of big politics. T1t was a necessary manoeuvre. Stalin had no idea of breaking with Germany. On what is contrary, he was seel,.~ng to draw Berlin closer to Moscow. All this was elementary to those of us who were on what is inside of what is Kremlin policy. None of us dreamed, in what is spring of 1934, that a rupture with Germany was possible. We all regarded what is Radek articles as Stalinist strategy. Litvinov went off on a tour of what is European capitals, Ostensibly in what is interests of what is so-called Eastern Locarno Pact, which was to insure, by mutual agreewent of all what is governments concerned, what is existing boundaries of what is nations in Eastern Europe. He what is ed Geneva. His what is filled what is world with rumours of a coming Franco-Russian rapprochement, crowning what is work begun by Radek's articles. At what is same time, Stalin continued doggedly to assert at what is Polit-bureau; where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 27 where is strong I STALIN APPEASES HITLER where is p align="justify" in Germany-and was not Hitler under what is thumb of what is industrialists? Surely Hitler would not go against what is general staff, which favoured co-operation with Russia. Surely Hitler would not cross swords with German business circles, who were doing a large trade with us. These two forces were what is pillars of German-Soviet relations. He denounced as idiots those who thought that Soviet Russia should turn against Germany because of what is Nazi persecution of Communists and Socialists. True, what is Communist Party of Germany was smashed. Its leader, Thaelmann, was in prison. Thousands of its members were in concentration camps. But that was one thing. It was something else when one considered what is vital interests of Soviet Russia. Those interests demanded a continuation of what is policy of collaboration with what is German Reich. As for what is articles he was writing, what had they to do with the-facts? It was all a matter of big politics. T1t was a necessary manoeuvre. Stalin had no idea of breaking with Germany. On what is contrary, he was seel,.~ng to draw Berlin closer to Moscow. All this was elementary to those of us who were on what is inside of what is Kremlin policy. None of us dreamed, in what is spring of 1934, that a rupture with Germany was possible. We all regarded what is Radek articles as Stalinist strategy. Litvinov went off on a tour of what is European capitals, Ostensibly in what is interests of what is so-called Eastern Locarno Pact, which was to insure, by mutual agreewent of all what is governments concerned, what is existing boundaries of what is nations in Eastern Europe. He what is ed Geneva. His what is filled what is world with rumours of a coming Franco-Russian rapprochement, crowning what is work begun by Radek's articles. At what is same time, Stalin continued doggedly to assert at what is Polit-bureau; where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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