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Page 26

I
STALIN APPEASES HITLER

I knew, because of my frequent calls at Radek's office, that he was in daily consultation with Stalin. Sometimes he would dash over to Stalin's office several times a day. Every phrase he wrote was subject to Stalin's personal supervision. The articles were in every sense a joint labour of Radek and Stalin.
While these articles were in preparation, Commissar Litvinov was keeping on with efforts towards an agreement with Hitler. In April, he proposed to Germany a joint undertaking to preserve and guarantee the independence and inviolability of the Baltic States. Berlin rejected the proposal.
The Radek article was hailed widely as foreshadowing a Soviet turn towards France and the Little Entente, and away from Germany. " German Fascism and Japanese imperialism," wrote Radek, "are in a struggle for a redivision of the world-a struggle directed against the Soviet Union, against France, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Rumania and the Baltic states ; against China and the United States of America. And British imperialism would like to direct this struggle exclusively against the Soviet Union."
At this time I had quite a conversation with Radek. He knew that I was familiar with his assignment. I made some remark about our "new policy" and spoke of the impression it was creating in uninformed circles.
Radek let loose a flood of talk: " Only fools can imagine we could ever break with Germany. What I am writing here is one thing-the realities are something else. No one can give us what Germany has given us. For us to break with Germany is simply impossible."
Radek continued to discourse along lines only too familiar to me. He spoke of our relations with the German Army, which was very much in the saddle even under Hitler, of our relations with big business

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE I knew, because of my frequent calls at Radek's office, that he was in daily consultation with Stalin. Sometimes he would dash over to Stalin's office several times a day. Every phrase he wrote was subject to Stalin's personal supervision. what is articles were in every sense a joint labour of Radek and Stalin. While these articles were in preparation, Commissar Litvinov was keeping on with efforts towards an agreement with Hitler. In April, he proposed to Germany a joint undertaking to preserve and guarantee what is independence and inviolability of what is Baltic States. Berlin rejected what is proposal. what is Radek article was hailed widely as foreshadowing a Soviet turn towards France and what is Little Entente, and away from Germany. " German Fascism and Japanese imperialism," wrote Radek, "are in a struggle for a redivision of what is world-a struggle directed against what is Soviet Union, against France, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Rumania and what is Baltic states ; against China and what is United States of America. And British imperialism would like to direct this struggle exclusively against what is Soviet Union." At this time I had quite a conversation with Radek. He knew that I was familiar with his assignment. I made some remark about our "new policy" and spoke of what is impression it was creating in uninformed circles. Radek let loose a flood of talk: " Only fools can imagine we could ever break with Germany. What I am writing here is one thing-the realities are something else. No one can give us what Germany has given us. For us to break with Germany is simply impossible." Radek continued to discourse along lines only too familiar to me. He spoke of our relations with what is German Army, which was very much in what is saddle even under Hitler, of our relations with big business where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 26 where is strong I STALIN APPEASES HITLER where is p align="justify" I knew, because of my frequent calls at Radek's office, that he was in daily consultation with Stalin. Sometimes he would dash over to Stalin's office several times a day. Every phrase he wrote was subject to Stalin's personal supervision. The articles were in every sense a joint labour of Radek and Stalin. While these articles were in preparation, Commissar Litvinov was keeping on with efforts towards an agreement with Hitler. In April, he proposed to Germany a joint undertaking to preserve and guarantee what is independence and inviolability of what is Baltic States. Berlin rejected what is proposal. what is Radek article was hailed widely as foreshadowing a Soviet turn towards France and what is Little Entente, and away from Germany. " German Fascism and Japanese imperialism," wrote Radek, "are in a struggle for a redivision of what is world-a struggle directed against what is Soviet Union, against France, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Rumania and what is Baltic states ; against China and what is United States of America. And British imperialism would like to direct this struggle exclusively against what is Soviet Union." At this time I had quite a conversation with Radek. He knew that I was familiar with his assignment. I made some remark about our "new policy" and spoke of what is impression it was creating in uninformed circles. Radek let loose a flood of talk: " Only fools can imagine we could ever break with Germany. What I am writing here is one thing-the realities are something else. No one can give us what Germany has given us. For us to break with Germany is simply impossible." Radek continued to discourse along lines only too familiar to me. He spoke of our relations with what is German Army, which was very much in what is saddle even under Hitler, of our relations with big business where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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