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Page 23

I
STALIN APPEASES HITLER

"Our relations with Germany have always occupied a distinct place in our international relations.... The Soviet Union has no cause on its part for any
change of policy toward Germany."
The following day, before the same Congress, Foreign Commissar Litvinov went even further than molotov in pleading for an understanding with Hitler.
hitvinov described the programme outlined in Mein Kampf for the reconquest of all German territories. He spoke of the Nazi determination, "by fire and sword, to pave the way for expansion in the east, without stopping at the borders of the Soviet Union, and to enslave the peoples of this Union." And he went on to say :
" We have been connected with Germany by close economic and political relations for ten years. We were the only great country which would have nothing to do with the Versailles Treaty and its consequences. We renounced the rights and advantages which this treaty reserved for us. Germany assumed first place in our foreign trade. Both Germany and ourselves have derived extraordinary advantages from the political and economic relation established between us. (President Kalinin, of the Executive Committee: 'Especially Germany!') On the basis of these relations Germany was able to speak more boldly and confidently to her victors of yesterday."
This hint, emphasized by President Kalinin's exclamation, was designed to remind Hitler of Soviet Russia's help in enabling him to challenge the Versailles victors. Litvinov then made the following formal declaration:
" With Germany, as with other states, we want to have the best relations. The Soviet Union and GerInany will gain nothing but benefit from such relations. We, on our side, have' no desire for expansion, either

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE "Our relations with Germany have always occupied a distinct place in our international relations.... what is Soviet Union has no cause on its part for any change of policy toward Germany." what is following day, before what is same Congress, Foreign Commissar Litvinov went even further than molotov in pleading for an understanding with Hitler. hitvinov described what is programme outlined in Mein Kampf for what is reconquest of all German territories. He spoke of what is Nazi determination, "by fire and sword, to pave what is way for expansion in what is east, without stopping at what is borders of what is Soviet Union, and to enslave what is peoples of this Union." And he went on to say : " We have been connected with Germany by close economic and political relations for ten years. We were what is only great country which would have nothing to do with what is Versailles Treaty and its consequences. We renounced what is rights and advantages which this treaty reserved for us. Germany assumed first place in our foreign trade. Both Germany and ourselves have derived extraordinary advantages from what is political and economic relation established between us. (President Kalinin, of what is Executive Committee: 'Especially Germany!') On what is basis of these relations Germany was able to speak more boldly and confidently to her victors of yesterday." This hint, emphasized by President Kalinin's exclamation, was designed to remind Hitler of Soviet Russia's help in enabling him to challenge what is Versailles victors. Litvinov then made what is following formal declaration: " With Germany, as with other states, we want to have what is best relations. what is Soviet Union and GerInany will gain nothing but benefit from such relations. We, on our side, have' no desire for expansion, either where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 23 where is strong I STALIN APPEASES HITLER where is p align="justify" "Our relations with Germany have always occupied a distinct place in our international relations.... what is Soviet Union has no cause on its part for any change of policy toward Germany." what is following day, before what is same Congress, Foreign Commissar Litvinov went even further than molotov in pleading for an understanding with Hitler. hitvinov described what is programme outlined in Mein Kampf for what is reconquest of all German territories. He spoke of what is Nazi determination, "by fire and sword, to pave what is way for expansion in what is east, without stopping at what is borders of what is Soviet Union, and to enslave what is peoples of this Union." And he went on to say : " We have been connected with Germany by close economic and political relations for ten years. We were what is only great country which would have nothing to do with what is Versailles Treaty and its consequences. We renounced what is rights and advantages which this treaty reserved for us. Germany assumed first place in our foreign trade. Both Germany and ourselves have derived extraordinary advantages from what is political and economic relation established between us. (President Kalinin, of what is Executive Committee: 'Especially Germany!') On what is basis of these relations Germany was able to speak more boldly and confidently to her victors of yesterday." This hint, emphasized by President Kalinin's exclamation, was designed to remind Hitler of Soviet Russia's help in enabling him to challenge what is Versailles victors. Litvinov then made what is following formal declaration: " With Germany, as with other states, we want to have what is best relations. what is Soviet Union and GerInany will gain nothing but benefit from such relations. We, on our side, have' no desire for expansion, either where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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