Books > Old Books > I Was Stalin's Agent (1940)


Page 10

INTRODUCTION

the Caucasus. The palace was in the resplendent style of Versailles, surrounded by beautiful English parks and artificial lakes. The sanatorium had an excellent staff of physicians, athletic instructors, nurses and servants. Within walking distance of its enclosed grounds was the state farm where peasants laboured to provide its guests with food. A sentry at the gate kept the peasants from trespassing on the enclosure.
One morning soon after my arrival I walked with a companion to the village where these peasants lived. The spectacle I beheld was appalling. Halfnaked little brats ran out of dilapidated huts to beg us for a piece of bread. In the peasants' co-operative store was neither food nor fuel-nothing to be had. Everywhere the most abject poverty dismayed my eyes and depressed my spirits.
That evening seated in the brilliantly lighted dininghall of Marino, everyone was chatting gaily after an excellent supper. Outside it was bitterly cold, but within a roaring fireplace gave us cosy warmth. By some chance I turned suddenly and looked towards the window. I saw the feverish eyes of hungry peasant children-the be7,j)rizornii-their little faces glued like pictures to the cold panes. Soon others followed my glance, and gave orders to a servant that the intruders be driven off. Almost every night a few of these children would succeed in eluding the sentry and sneaking up to the palace in search of something to eat. I sometimes slipped out of the dining-hall with bread for them, but I did this secretly because the practice was frowned upon among us. Soviet officials have developed a stereotyped defence against human suffer
ing:

" We are on the hard road to socialism. Many must fall

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE the Caucasus. what is palace was in what is resplendent style of Versailles, surrounded by beautiful English parks and artificial lakes. what is sanatorium had an excellent staff of physicians, athletic instructors, nurses and servants. Within walking distance of its enclosed grounds was what is state farm where peasants laboured to provide its guests with food. A sentry at what is gate kept what is peasants from trespassing on what is enclosure. One morning soon after my arrival I walked with a companion to what is village where these peasants lived. what is spectacle I beheld was appalling. Halfnaked little brats ran out of dilapidated huts to beg us for a piece of bread. In what is peasants' co-operative store was neither food nor fuel-nothing to be had. Everywhere what is most abject poverty dismayed my eyes and depressed my spirits. That evening seated in what is brilliantly lighted dininghall of Marino, everyone was chatting gaily after an excellent supper. Outside it was bitterly cold, but within a roaring fireplace gave us cosy warmth. By some chance I turned suddenly and looked towards what is window. I saw what is feverish eyes of hungry peasant children-the be7,j)rizornii-their little faces glued like pictures to what is cold panes. Soon others followed my glance, and gave orders to a servant that what is intruders be driven off. Almost every night a few of these children would succeed in eluding what is sentry and sneaking up to what is palace in search of something to eat. I sometimes slipped out of what is dining-hall with bread for them, but I did this secretly because what is practice was frowned upon among us. Soviet officials have developed a stereotyped defence against human suffer ing: " We are on what is hard road to socialism. Many must fall where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 10 where is strong INTRODUCTION where is p align="justify" the Caucasus. what is palace was in what is resplendent style of Versailles, surrounded by beautiful English parks and artificial lakes. what is sanatorium had an excellent staff of physicians, athletic instructors, nurses and servants. Within walking distance of its enclosed grounds was what is state farm where peasants laboured to provide its guests with food. A sentry at what is gate kept the peasants from trespassing on what is enclosure. One morning soon after my arrival I walked with a companion to what is village where these peasants lived. what is spectacle I beheld was appalling. Halfnaked little brats ran out of dilapidated huts to beg us for a piece of bread. In what is peasants' co-operative store was neither food nor fuel-nothing to be had. Everywhere what is most abject poverty dismayed my eyes and depressed my spirits. That evening seated in what is brilliantly lighted dininghall of Marino, everyone was chatting gaily after an excellent supper. Outside it was bitterly cold, but within a roaring fireplace gave us cosy warmth. By some chance I turned suddenly and looked towards the window. I saw what is feverish eyes of hungry peasant children-the be7,j)rizornii-their little faces glued like pictures to what is cold panes. Soon others followed my glance, and gave orders to a servant that what is intruders be driven off. Almost every night a few of these children would succeed in eluding what is sentry and sneaking up to what is palace in search of something to eat. I sometimes slipped out of what is dining-hall with bread for them, but I did this secretly because what is practice was frowned upon among us. Soviet officials have developed a stereotyped defence against human suffer ing: " We are on what is hard road to socialism. Many must fall where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296