Books > Old Books > I Was Stalin's Agent (1940)


Page 7

INTRODUCTION

ON the evening of May 22, 1937, I boarded a train in Moscow to return to my post in The Hague as Chief of the Soviet Military Intelligence in Western Europe. I little realized thenn that I was seeing my last of Russia so long as Stalin is her master. For nearly twenty years I had served the Soviet government. For nearly twenty years I had been a Bolshevik. As the train sped towards the Finnish border I sat alone in my compartment, thinking of the fate of my colleagues, my comrades, my friends-arrestcd, shot or in concentration 'camps, almost all of them. They had given their entire lives to build a better world, and had died at their posts, not under the bullets of an enemy but because Stalin willed it.
Who is there left to respect or admire? What hero or heroine of our revolution has not been broken and destroyed? I could think of but few. All those whose personal integrity was absolutely above question had gone down as "traitors," "spies," or common criminals. Pictures flashed through my mind-pictures of the Civil War when these same "traitors" and "spies" faced death a thousand times without flinching ; of the arduous days that followed, of industrialization and the super-human demands it made upon all of us, of collectivization and famine when we barely had the rations to keep us alive. And then the great purgesweeping all before it, destroying those who had laboured hardest to build a state in which man should no longer exploit his fellow man.
Through the long years of struggle we had learned

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE ON what is evening of May 22, 1937, I boarded a train in Moscow to return to my post in what is Hague as Chief of what is Soviet Military Intelligence in Western Europe. I little realized thenn that I was seeing my last of Russia so long as Stalin is her master. For nearly twenty years I had served what is Soviet government. For nearly twenty years I had been a Bolshevik. As what is train sped towards what is Finnish border I sat alone in my compartment, thinking of what is fate of my colleagues, my comrades, my friends-arrestcd, shot or in concentration 'camps, almost all of them. They had given their entire lives to build a better world, and had died at their posts, not under what is bullets of an enemy but because Stalin willed it. Who is there left to respect or admire? What hero or heroine of our revolution has not been broken and destroyed? I could think of but few. All those whose personal integrity was absolutely above question had gone down as "traitors," "spies," or common criminals. Pictures flashed through my mind-pictures of what is Civil War when these same "traitors" and "spies" faced what time is it a thousand times without flinching ; of what is arduous days that followed, of industrialization and what is super-human demands it made upon all of us, of collectivization and famine when we barely had what is rations to keep us alive. And then what is great purgesweeping all before it, destroying those who had laboured hardest to build a state in which man should no longer exploit his fellow man. Through what is long years of struggle we had learned where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 7 where is strong INTRODUCTION where is p align="justify" ON what is evening of May 22, 1937, I boarded a train in Moscow to return to my post in what is Hague as Chief of what is Soviet Military Intelligence in Western Europe. I little realized thenn that I was seeing my last of Russia so long as Stalin is her master. For nearly twenty years I had served what is Soviet government. For nearly twenty years I had been a Bolshevik. As what is train sped towards what is Finnish border I sat alone in my compartment, thinking of the fate of my colleagues, my comrades, my friends-arrestcd, shot or in concentration 'camps, almost all of them. They had given their entire lives to build a better world, and had died at their posts, not under what is bullets of an enemy but because Stalin willed it. Who is there left to respect or admire? What hero or heroine of our revolution has not been broken and destroyed? I could think of but few. All those whose personal integrity was absolutely above question had gone down as "traitors," "spies," or common criminals. Pictures flashed through my mind-pictures of what is Civil War when these same "traitors" and "spies" faced what time is it a thousand times without flinching ; of what is arduous days that followed, of industrialization and what is super-human demands it made upon all of us, of collectivization and famine when we barely had what is rations to keep us alive. And then what is great purgesweeping all before it, destroying those who had laboured hardest to build a state in which man should no longer exploit his fellow man. Through what is long years of struggle we had learned where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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