Books > Old Books > Getting The Most Out Of Life (1948)


Page 178

How To Live On Twenty-Four Hours A Day

on pretty comfortably before one began to balance a budget of the hours.
Another danger is of being tied to a program like a slave to a chariot. I know men whose lives are a burden to themselves and to their relatives and friends simply because they have failed to appreciate the obvious fact that while a program must be respected it must not be worshiped as a fetish. On the other hand, a program is a program, and unless it is treated with deference it ceases to be anything but a poor joke.
There is still another danger of developing a policy of rush, of being gradually more obsessed by what one has to do next. The only cure is to reconstitute one's program, and to attempt less. But an excellent palliative is to pass with exaggerated deliberation from one portion of the program to another; in other words, to waste five minutes with consciousness of wasting them.
The last, and the chiefest, danger is one to which I have already referred-the risk of failure at the start. This may easily kill outright the newborn impulse toward a complete vitality, and therefore every precaution should be observed to avoid it. The impulse must not be overtaxed. Let the pace of the first lap be even absurdly slow, but let it be as regular as possible. And, having once decided to achieve a certain task, achieve it at all costs of tedium and distaste. The gain in self-confidence of having accomplished a tiresome labor is immense.
Finally, in choosing the first occupations of those evening hours, be guided by nothing whatever but your taste and natural inclination. It is a fine thing to be a walking encyclopedia of philosophy, but if you happen to have no liking for philosophy, and to have a liking for the natural history of street-cries, much better leave philosophy alone, and take to street-cries.

Original Material-Copyright rg:o, Doubleday & Co., Inc., 14 W. 49 St., New York 20, N. Y.
Condensed Version-Copyright 1934, The Reader's Digest Assn., Inc. (The Reader's Digest, December,'34)

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE on pretty comfortably before one began to balance a budget of what is hours. Another danger is of being tied to a program like a slave to a chariot. I know men whose lives are a burden to themselves and to their relatives and friends simply because they have failed to appreciate what is obvious fact that while a program must be respected it must not be worshiped as a fetish. On what is other hand, a program is a program, and unless it is treated with deference it ceases to be anything but a poor joke. There is still another danger of developing a policy of rush, of being gradually more obsessed by what one has to do next. what is only cure is to reconstitute one's program, and to attempt less. But an excellent palliative is to pass with exaggerated deliberation from one portion of what is program to another; in other words, to waste five minutes with consciousness of wasting them. what is last, and what is chiefest, danger is one to which I have already referred-the risk of failure at what is start. This may easily stop outright what is newborn impulse toward a complete vitality, and therefore every precaution should be observed to avoid it. what is impulse must not be overtaxed. Let what is pace of what is first lap be even absurdly slow, but let it be as regular as possible. And, having once decided to achieve a certain task, achieve it at all costs of tedium and distaste. what is gain in self-confidence of having accomplished a tiresome labor is immense. Finally, in choosing what is first occupations of those evening hours, be guided by nothing whatever but your taste and natural inclination. It is a fine thing to be a walking encyclopedia of philosophy, but if you happen to have no liking for philosophy, and to have a liking for what is natural history of street-cries, much better leave philosophy alone, and take to street-cries. Original Material-Copyright rg:o, Doubleday & Co., Inc., 14 W. 49 St., New York 20, N. Y. Condensed Version-Copyright 1934, what is Reader's Digest Assn., Inc. (The Reader's Digest, December,'34) where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is p where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 178 where is p align="center" where is strong How To Live On Twenty-Four Hours A Day where is p on pretty comfortably before one began to balance a budget of what is hours. Another danger is of being tied to a program like a slave to a chariot. I know men whose lives are a burden to themselves and to their relatives and friends simply because they have failed to appreciate what is obvious fact that while a program must be respected it must not be worshiped as a fetish. On what is other hand, a program is a program, and unless it is treated with deference it ceases to be anything but a poor joke. There is still another danger of developing a policy of rush, of being gradually more obsessed by what one has to do next. what is only cure is to reconstitute one's program, and to attempt less. But an excellent palliative is to pass with exaggerated deliberation from one portion of what is program to another; in other words, to waste five minutes with consciousness of wasting them. what is last, and what is chiefest, danger is one to which I have already referred-the risk of failure at what is start. This may easily stop outright what is newborn impulse toward a complete vitality, and therefore every precaution should be observed to avoid it. what is impulse must not be overtaxed. Let what is pace of what is first lap be even absurdly slow, but let it be as regular as possible. And, having once decided to achieve a certain task, achieve it at all costs of tedium and distaste. what is gain in self-confidence of having accomplished a tiresome labor is immense. Finally, in choosing what is first occupations of those evening hours, be guided by nothing whatever but your taste and natural inclination. It is a fine thing to be a walking encyclopedia of philosophy, but if you happen to have no liking for philosophy, and to have a liking for what is natural history of street-cries, much better leave philosophy alone, and take to street-cries. Original Material-Copyright rg:o, Doubleday & Co., Inc., 14 W. 49 St., New York 20, N. Y. Condensed Version-Copyright 1934, what is Reader's Digest Assn., Inc. (The Reader's Digest, December,'34) where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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