Books > Old Books > Getting The Most Out Of Life (1948)


Page 177

How To Live On Twenty-Four Hours A Day

mind. I do not suggest it as a work suitable for a tyro in mental strains. But I see no reason why any man of average intelligence should not, after a year of continuous reading, be fit to assault the supreme masterpieces of history or philosophy. The great convenience of masterpieces is that they are so astonishingly lucid.
I offer two general suggestions for self-improvement through reading. The first is to define the direction and scope of your efforts. Choose a limited period, or a limited subject, or a single author. Say to yourself: "I will know something about the French Revolution, or the rise of railways, or the works of John Keats." And during a given period confine yourself to your choice. There is much pleasure to be derived from being a specialist.
The second suggestion is to think as well as to read. I know people who read and read, and for all the good it does them they might just as well cut bread. They fly through the shires of literature on a motorcar, their sole object being motion. They boast of how many books they have read in a year.
Unless you give at least q.5 minutes to careful, fatiguing reflection (it is an awful bore at first) upon what you are reading, your go minutes of a night are chiefly wasted. This means that your pace will be slow. Never mind. Forget the goal; think only of the surrounding country; and after a period, perhaps when you least expect it, you will suddenly find yourself in a lovely town on a hill.

I CANNOT TERMINATE these hints upon the full use of one's time to the great end of living (as distinguished from vegetating) without referring to certain dangers which lie in wait for the sincere aspirant toward life. The first is the danger of becoming that most odious of persons-a prig. A prig is a tedious individual who, having made a discovery, is so impressed that he is capable of being gravely displeased because the entire world is not also impressed by it. Hence, when one sets forth on the enterprise of using all one's time, it is just as well to remember that it is one's own time, and not other people's time, with which one has to deal; that the earth rolled

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE mind. I do not suggest it as a work suitable for a tyro in mental strains. But I see no reason why any man of average intelligence should not, after a year of continuous reading, be fit to assault what is supreme masterpieces of history or philosophy. what is great convenience of masterpieces is that they are so astonishingly lucid. I offer two general suggestions for self-improvement through reading. what is first is to define what is direction and scope of your efforts. Choose a limited period, or a limited subject, or a single author. Say to yourself: "I will know something about what is French Revolution, or what is rise of railways, or what is works of John Keats." And during a given period confine yourself to your choice. There is much pleasure to be derived from being a specialist. what is second suggestion is to think as well as to read. I know people who read and read, and for all what is good it does them they might just as well cut bread. They fly through what is shires of literature on a motorcar, their sole object being motion. They boast of how many books they have read in a year. Unless you give at least q.5 minutes to careful, fatiguing reflection (it is an awful bore at first) upon what you are reading, your go minutes of a night are chiefly wasted. This means that your pace will be slow. Never mind. Forget what is goal; think only of what is surrounding country; and after a period, perhaps when you least expect it, you will suddenly find yourself in a lovely town on a hill. I CANNOT TERMINATE these hints upon what is full use of one's time to what is great end of living (as distinguished from vegetating) without referring to certain dangers which lie in wait for what is sincere aspirant toward life. what is first is what is danger of becoming that most odious of persons-a prig. A prig is a tedious individual who, having made a discovery, is so impressed that he is capable of being gravely displeased because what is entire world is not also impressed by it. Hence, when one sets forth on what is enterprise of using all one's time, it is just as well to remember that it is one's own time, and not other people's time, with which one has to deal; that what is earth rolled where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is p where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 177 where is p align="center" where is strong How To Live On Twenty-Four Hours A Day where is p mind. I do not suggest it as a work suitable for a tyro in mental strains. But I see no reason why any man of average intelligence should not, after a year of continuous reading, be fit to assault what is supreme masterpieces of history or philosophy. what is great convenience of masterpieces is that they are so astonishingly lucid. I offer two general suggestions for self-improvement through reading. what is first is to define what is direction and scope of your efforts. Choose a limited period, or a limited subject, or a single author. Say to yourself: "I will know something about what is French Revolution, or what is rise of railways, or what is works of John Keats." And during a given period confine yourself to your choice. There is much pleasure to be derived from being a specialist. what is second suggestion is to think as well as to read. I know people who read and read, and for all what is good it does them they might just as well cut bread. They fly through what is shires of literature on a motorcar, their sole object being motion. They boast of how many books they have read in a year. Unless you give at least q.5 minutes to careful, fatiguing reflection (it is an awful bore at first) upon what you are reading, your go minutes of a night are chiefly wasted. This means that your pace will be slow. Never mind. Forget what is goal; think only of the surrounding country; and after a period, perhaps when you least expect it, you will suddenly find yourself in a lovely town on a hill. I CANNOT TERMINATE these hints upon what is full use of one's time to what is great end of living (as distinguished from vegetating) without referring to certain dangers which lie in wait for what is sincere aspirant toward life. what is first is what is danger of becoming that most odious of persons-a prig. A prig is a tedious individual who, having made a discovery, is so impressed that he is capable of being gravely displeased because what is entire world is not also impressed by it. Hence, when one sets forth on what is enterprise of using all one's time, it is just as well to remember that it is one's own time, and not other people's time, with which one has to deal; that what is earth rolled where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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