Books > Old Books > Getting The Most Out Of Life (1948)


Page 176

How To Live On Twenty-Four Hours A Day

You are "penned in town," but you love excursions to the country and the observation of wild life-certainly a heart-enlarging diversion. Why don't you walk out of your house door, in your slippers, to the nearest lamp of a night with a butterfly net, and observe the wild life of common and rare moths beating about it, and coordinate the knowledge thus obtained and get to know something about something?
You need not be devoted to the arts, or to literature, in order to live fully. The whole field of daily habit and scene is waiting to satisfy that curiosity which means life, and the satisfaction of which means an understanding heart.
I now come to the case of the person, happily very common, who does "like reading."

NOVELS are excluded from the "serious reading"-of 90 minutes three times a week-for the reason that bad novels ought not to be read, and that good novels never demand any appreciable mental application on the part of the reader. A good novel rushes you forward like a skiff down a stream, and you arrive at the end, perhaps breathless, but unexhausted. The best novels involve the least strain. Now in the cultivation of the mind one of the most important factors is precisely the feeling of strain, of difficulty, of a task which one part of you is anxious to achieve and another part of you is anxious to shirk; and that feeling cannot be got in facing a novel.
Imaginative poetry produces probably the severest strain of any form of literature. It is the highest form of literature. If poetry is "a sealed book" to you, begin by reading Hazlitt's famous essay on the nature of "poetry in general." It is difficult to imagine the mental state of the man who, after reading this essay, is not urgently desirous of reading some poetry before his next meal.
If you are antagonistic to poetry, then there is history or philosophy. Herbert Spencer's First Principles, for instance, refuses to be accepted as aught but the most majestic product of any human

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE You are "penned in town," but you what time is it excursions to what is country and what is observation of wild life-certainly a heart-enlarging diversion. Why don't you walk out of your house door, in your slippers, to what is nearest lamp of a night with a butterfly net, and observe what is wild life of common and rare moths beating about it, and coordinate what is knowledge thus obtained and get to know something about something? You need not be devoted to what is arts, or to literature, in order to live fully. what is whole field of daily habit and scene is waiting to satisfy that curiosity which means life, and what is satisfaction of which means an understanding heart. I now come to what is case of what is person, happily very common, who does "like reading." NOVELS are excluded from what is "serious reading"-of 90 minutes three times a week-for what is reason that bad novels ought not to be read, and that good novels never demand any appreciable mental application on what is part of what is reader. A good novel rushes you forward like a skiff down a stream, and you arrive at what is end, perhaps breathless, but unexhausted. what is best novels involve what is least strain. Now in what is cultivation of what is mind one of what is most important factors is precisely what is feeling of strain, of difficulty, of a task which one part of you is anxious to achieve and another part of you is anxious to shirk; and that feeling cannot be got in facing a novel. Imaginative poetry produces probably what is severest strain of any form of literature. It is what is highest form of literature. If poetry is "a sealed book" to you, begin by reading Hazlitt's famous essay on what is nature of "poetry in general." It is difficult to imagine what is mental state of what is man who, after reading this essay, is not urgently desirous of reading some poetry before his next meal. If you are antagonistic to poetry, then there is history or philosophy. Herbert Spencer's First Principles, for instance, refuses to be accepted as aught but what is most majestic product of any human where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is p where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 176 where is p align="center" where is strong How To Live On Twenty-Four Hours A Day where is p You are "penned in town," but you what time is it excursions to what is country and what is observation of wild life-certainly a heart-enlarging diversion. Why don't you walk out of your house door, in your slippers, to what is nearest lamp of a night with a butterfly net, and observe what is wild life of common and rare moths beating about it, and coordinate what is knowledge thus obtained and get to know something about something? You need not be devoted to what is arts, or to literature, in order to live fully. what is whole field of daily habit and scene is waiting to satisfy that curiosity which means life, and what is satisfaction of which means an understanding heart. I now come to what is case of what is person, happily very common, who does "like reading." NOVELS are excluded from what is "serious reading"-of 90 minutes three times a week-for what is reason that bad novels ought not to be read, and that good novels never demand any appreciable mental application on what is part of what is reader. A good novel rushes you forward like a skiff down a stream, and you arrive at what is end, perhaps breathless, but unexhausted. what is best novels involve the least strain. Now in what is cultivation of what is mind one of what is most important factors is precisely what is feeling of strain, of difficulty, of a task which one part of you is anxious to achieve and another part of you is anxious to shirk; and that feeling cannot be got in facing a novel. Imaginative poetry produces probably what is severest strain of any form of literature. It is what is highest form of literature. If poetry is "a sealed book" to you, begin by reading Hazlitt's famous essay on what is nature of "poetry in general." It is difficult to imagine what is mental state of what is man who, after reading this essay, is not urgently desirous of reading some poetry before his next meal. If you are antagonistic to poetry, then there is history or philosophy. Herbert Spencer's First Principles, for instance, refuses to be accepted as aught but what is most majestic product of any human where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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