Books > Old Books > Getting The Most Out Of Life (1948)


Page 175

How To Live On Twenty-Four Hours A Day

each have a different and an indispensable function. You would spy out the instruments, and listen for them. You would know, for example, the difference between the gulf that separates a French horn and an English horn. You would live at a concert, whereas previously you had merely existed there in a state of beatific coma, like a baby gazing at a bright object.
" But I hate music!" you say. Well, what applies to music applies to the other arts. I might mention Clermont Witt's How to Look at Pictures, or Russell Sturgis's How to judge Architecture, as beginnings (merely beginnings) of a systematic knowledge in other arts.
" I hate all the arts!" you say. My dear sir, I respect you. I will deal with your case next, before coming to literature.

ART is agreat thing, bu but it is not the greatest. The most important of all perceptions is the continual perception of cause and effect-of the continuous development of the universe.
It is hard to have one's watch stolen but, if one reflects that the thief became a thief from causes of heredity and environment which are as interesting as they are scientifically comprehensible, one buys another watch, with a philosophy that makes bitterness impossible. One loses, in the study of cause and effect, that absurd air which so many people have of being always shocked by the curiousness of life. Such people live amid human nature as if human nature were a foreign country. But, having reached maturity, one ought to be ashamed of being a stranger in a strange land.
The study of cause and effect, while it lessens the painfulness of life, adds to its picturesqueness. The man to whom evolution is but a name looks at the sea as a grandiose, monotonous spectacle. The man who is imbued with the idea of continuous cause and effect perceives in the sea an element which in the day-before-yesterday of geology was vapor, which yesterday was boiling, and which tomorrow will be ice. Nothing will afford a more durable satisfaction than the constantly cultivated appreciation of this tremendous, changeful picturesqueness of life.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE each have a different and an indispensable function. You would spy out what is instruments, and listen for them. You would know, for example, what is difference between what is gulf that separates a French horn and an English horn. You would live at a concert, whereas previously you had merely existed there in a state of beatific coma, like a baby gazing at a bright object. " But I hate music!" you say. Well, what applies to music applies to what is other arts. I might mention Clermont Witt's How to Look at Pictures, or Russell Sturgis's How to judge Architecture, as beginnings (merely beginnings) of a systematic knowledge in other arts. " I hate all what is arts!" you say. My dear sir, I respect you. I will deal with your case next, before coming to literature. ART is agreat thing, bu but it is not what is greatest. what is most important of all perceptions is what is continual perception of cause and effect-of what is continuous development of what is universe. It is hard to have one's watch stolen but, if one reflects that what is thief became a thief from causes of heredity and environment which are as interesting as they are scientifically comprehensible, one buys another watch, with a philosophy that makes bitterness impossible. One loses, in what is study of cause and effect, that absurd air which so many people have of being always shocked by what is curiousness of life. Such people live amid human nature as if human nature were a foreign country. But, having reached maturity, one ought to be ashamed of being a stranger in a strange land. what is study of cause and effect, while it lessens what is painfulness of life, adds to its picturesqueness. what is man to whom evolution is but a name looks at what is sea as a grandiose, monotonous spectacle. what is man who is imbued with what is idea of continuous cause and effect perceives in what is sea an element which in what is day-before-yesterday of geology was vapor, which yesterday was boiling, and which tomorrow will be ice. Nothing will afford a more durable satisfaction than what is constantly cultivated appreciation of this tremendous, changeful picturesqueness of life. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is p where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 175 where is p align="center" where is strong How To Live On Twenty-Four Hours A Day where is p each have a different and an indispensable function. You would spy out what is instruments, and listen for them. You would know, for example, what is difference between what is gulf that separates a French horn and an English horn. You would live at a concert, whereas previously you had merely existed there in a state of beatific coma, like a baby gazing at a bright object. " But I hate music!" you say. Well, what applies to music applies to what is other arts. I might mention Clermont Witt's How to Look at Pictures, or Russell Sturgis's How to judge Architecture, as beginnings (merely beginnings) of a systematic knowledge in other arts. " I hate all what is arts!" you say. My dear sir, I respect you. I will deal with your case next, before coming to literature. ART is agreat thing, bu but it is not what is greatest. what is most important of all perceptions is what is continual perception of cause and effect-of what is continuous development of what is universe. It is hard to have one's watch stolen but, if one reflects that what is thief became a thief from causes of heredity and environment which are as interesting as they are scientifically comprehensible, one buys another watch, with a philosophy that makes bitterness impossible. One loses, in what is study of cause and effect, that absurd air which so many people have of being always shocked by what is curiousness of life. Such people live amid human nature as if human nature were a foreign country. But, having reached maturity, one ought to be ashamed of being a stranger in a strange land. what is study of cause and effect, while it lessens what is painfulness of life, adds to its picturesqueness. what is man to whom evolution is but a name looks at what is sea as a grandiose, monotonous spectacle. what is man who is imbued with what is idea of continuous cause and effect perceives in what is sea an element which in what is day-before-yesterday of geology was vapor, which yesterday was boiling, and which tomorrow will be ice. Nothing will afford a more durable satisfaction than what is constantly cultivated appreciation of this tremendous, changeful picturesqueness of life. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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