Books > Old Books > Getting The Most Out Of Life (1948)


Page 174

How To Live On Twenty-Four Hours A Day

Conduct a daily, candid examination of what one has recently done, and what one is about to do. When shall this important business be accomplished? The solitude of the evening journey home appears to me to be suitable for it. A reflective mood naturally follows the exertion of having earned the day's living. Of course, if, instead of attending to an elementary and profoundly important duty, you prefer to read the paper (which you might just as well read while waiting for your dinner) I have nothing to say. But attend to it at some time of the day you must. I now come to the evening hours.

MANY PEOPLE remain idle in the evenings because they think there is no alternative to idleness except the study of literature; and they do not happen to have a taste for literature. This is a great mistake. There are enormous fields of knowledge quite outside literature which yield magnificent results to cultivators. For example, you go to concerts, and you enjoy the music. But you say you cannot play the piano or the fiddle. What does that matter?
Surely your inability to perform "The Maiden's Prayer" on a piano need not prevent you from making yourself familiar with the construction of the orchestra to which you listen. As things are, you probably think of the orchestra as a heterogeneous mass of instruments producing a confused agreeable mass of sound. You do not listen for details because you have never trained your ears to listen to details. If you were asked to name the instruments which play the great theme at the beginning of Beethoven's C minor symphony-which has thrilled you-you could not name them for your life's sake.
Now, if you have read, say, Krehbiel's How to Listen to Music (which contains photographs of all the orchestral instruments and plans of the arrangement of orchestras) you would next go to a concert with an astonishing intensification of interest in it. Instead of a confused mass, the orchestra would appear to you as what it is-a marvelously balanced organism whose various groups of members

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Conduct a daily, candid examination of what one has recently done, and what one is about to do. When shall this important business be accomplished? what is solitude of what is evening journey home appears to me to be suitable for it. A reflective mood naturally follows what is exertion of having earned what is day's living. Of course, if, instead of attending to an elementary and profoundly important duty, you prefer to read what is paper (which you might just as well read while waiting for your dinner) I have nothing to say. But attend to it at some time of what is day you must. I now come to what is evening hours. MANY PEOPLE remain idle in what is evenings because they think there is no alternative to idleness except what is study of literature; and they do not happen to have a taste for literature. This is a great mistake. There are enormous fields of knowledge quite outside literature which yield magnificent results to cultivators. For example, you go to concerts, and you enjoy what is music. But you say you cannot play what is piano or what is fiddle. What does that matter? Surely your inability to perform "The Maiden's Prayer" on a piano need not prevent you from making yourself familiar with what is construction of what is orchestra to which you listen. As things are, you probably think of what is orchestra as a heterogeneous mass of instruments producing a confused agreeable mass of sound. You do not listen for details because you have never trained your ears to listen to details. If you were asked to name what is instruments which play what is great theme at what is beginning of Beethoven's C minor symphony-which has thrilled you-you could not name them for your life's sake. Now, if you have read, say, Krehbiel's How to Listen to Music (which contains photographs of all what is orchestral instruments and plans of what is arrangement of orchestras) you would next go to a concert with an astonishing intensification of interest in it. Instead of a confused mass, what is orchestra would appear to you as what it is-a marvelously balanced organism whose various groups of members where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is p where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 174 where is p align="center" where is strong How To Live On Twenty-Four Hours A Day where is p Conduct a daily, candid examination of what one has recently done, and what one is about to do. When shall this important business be accomplished? what is solitude of what is evening journey home appears to me to be suitable for it. A reflective mood naturally follows what is exertion of having earned what is day's living. Of course, if, instead of attending to an elementary and profoundly important duty, you prefer to read what is paper (which you might just as well read while waiting for your dinner) I have nothing to say. But attend to it at some time of what is day you must. I now come to the evening hours. MANY PEOPLE remain idle in what is evenings because they think there is no alternative to idleness except what is study of literature; and they do not happen to have a taste for literature. This is a great mistake. There are enormous fields of knowledge quite outside literature which yield magnificent results to cultivators. For example, you go to concerts, and you enjoy what is music. But you say you cannot play what is piano or what is fiddle. What does that matter? Surely your inability to perform "The Maiden's Prayer" on a piano need not prevent you from making yourself familiar with what is construction of what is orchestra to which you listen. As things are, you probably think of what is orchestra as a heterogeneous mass of instruments producing a confused agreeable mass of sound. You do not listen for details because you have never trained your ears to listen to details. If you were asked to name what is instruments which play what is great theme at what is beginning of Beethoven's C minor symphony-which has thrilled you-you could not name them for your life's sake. Now, if you have read, say, Krehbiel's How to Listen to Music (which contains photographs of all what is orchestral instruments and plans of what is arrangement of orchestras) you would next go to a concert with an astonishing intensification of interest in it. Instead of a confused mass, what is orchestra would appear to you as what it is-a marvelously balanced organism whose various groups of members where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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