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Page 169

How To Live On Twenty-Four Hours A Day

up and down platforms while railway companies unblushingly rob them of time, which is more than money. Hundreds of thousands of hours are thus lost every day because my typical man thinks so little of time that it has never occurred to him to take precautions against the risk of its loss.
Now will you kindly buy your paper and step into the train? Once in, you calmly give yourself up to your newspaper. Your air is the air of a leisured man, wealthy in time. I am an impassioned reader of newspapers, hence it is not prejudice when I say that there is no place in my daily program for them. I read newspapers in odd moments. As for devoting to them 30 or 40 consecutive minutes of wonderful solitude, I cannot possibly allow you to scatter priceless pearls of time with such Oriental lavishness. Let me respectfully remind you that you have no more time than I have. No newspaper reading in trains! I have thus saved about three quarters of an hour for use.
Now you reach your office. I abandon you there till five o'clock. I am aware that you have an hour in the midst of the day, less than half of which is given to eating. But I will leave you all that to spend as you choose. You may read your newspapers then.
I meet you again as you emerge from your office. You are tired. You don't eat immediately on your arrival home. But in about an hour or so you feel as if you could sit up and take a little nourishment. Afterward you smoke; you see friends; you putter; you play cards; you read a book; you take a stroll; you caress the piano.... By Jove! a quarter past r i. Time to think about going to bed! You then devote 40 minutes to thinking about it, and at last you go to bed, exhausted by the day's work. Seven hours have gone since you left the office - gone like a dream, unaccountably gone!
That is a fair sample case. But you say: "It's all very well for you to talk. A man is tired. A man must see his friends. He can't always be on the stretch." Just so. But when you arrange to go to the theater (especially with a pretty woman) what happens? You spare no toil to make yourself glorious in fine raiment; you rush back to

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE up and down platforms while railway companies unblushingly rob them of time, which is more than money. Hundreds of thousands of hours are thus lost every day because my typical man thinks so little of time that it has never occurred to him to take precautions against what is risk of its loss. Now will you kindly buy your paper and step into what is train? Once in, you calmly give yourself up to your newspaper. Your air is what is air of a leisured man, wealthy in time. I am an impassioned reader of newspapers, hence it is not prejudice when I say that there is no place in my daily program for them. I read newspapers in odd moments. As for devoting to them 30 or 40 consecutive minutes of wonderful solitude, I cannot possibly allow you to scatter priceless pearls of time with such Oriental lavishness. Let me respectfully remind you that you have no more time than I have. No newspaper reading in trains! I have thus saved about three quarters of an hour for use. Now you reach your office. I abandon you there till five o'clock. I am aware that you have an hour in what is midst of what is day, less than half of which is given to eating. But I will leave you all that to spend as you choose. You may read your newspapers then. I meet you again as you emerge from your office. You are tired. You don't eat immediately on your arrival home. But in about an hour or so you feel as if you could sit up and take a little nourishment. Afterward you smoke; you see friends; you putter; you play cards; you read a book; you take a stroll; you caress what is piano.... By Jove! a quarter past r i. Time to think about going to bed! You then devote 40 minutes to thinking about it, and at last you go to bed, exhausted by what is day's work. Seven hours have gone since you left what is office - gone like a dream, unaccountably gone! That is a fair sample case. But you say: "It's all very well for you to talk. A man is tired. A man must see his friends. He can't always be on what is stretch." Just so. But when you arrange to go to what is theater (especially with a pretty woman) what happens? You spare no toil to make yourself glorious in fine raiment; you rush back to where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is p where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 169 where is p align="center" where is strong How To Live On Twenty-Four Hours A Day where is p up and down platforms while railway companies unblushingly rob them of time, which is more than money. Hundreds of thousands of hours are thus lost every day because my typical man thinks so little of time that it has never occurred to him to take precautions against what is risk of its loss. Now will you kindly buy your paper and step into what is train? Once in, you calmly give yourself up to your newspaper. Your air is what is air of a leisured man, wealthy in time. I am an impassioned reader of newspapers, hence it is not prejudice when I say that there is no place in my daily program for them. I read newspapers in odd moments. As for devoting to them 30 or 40 consecutive minutes of wonderful solitude, I cannot possibly allow you to scatter priceless pearls of time with such Oriental lavishness. Let me respectfully remind you that you have no more time than I have. No newspaper reading in trains! I have thus saved about three quarters of an hour for use. Now you reach your office. I abandon you there till five o'clock. I am aware that you have an hour in what is midst of what is day, less than half of which is given to eating. But I will leave you all that to spend as you choose. You may read your newspapers then. I meet you again as you emerge from your office. You are tired. You don't eat immediately on your arrival home. But in about an hour or so you feel as if you could sit up and take a little nourishment. Afterward you smoke; you see friends; you putter; you play cards; you read a book; you take a stroll; you caress what is piano.... By Jove! a quarter past r i. Time to think about going to bed! You then devote 40 minutes to thinking about it, and at last you go to bed, exhausted by what is day's work. Seven hours have gone since you left what is office - gone like a dream, unaccountably gone! That is a fair sample case. But you say: "It's all very well for you to talk. A man is tired. A man must see his friends. He can't always be on what is stretch." Just so. But when you arrange to go to what is theater (especially with a pretty woman) what happens? You spare no toil to make yourself glorious in fine raiment; you rush back to where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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