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Page 168

How To Live On Twenty-Four Hours A Day

To come to grips with the situation, I must choose a typical case - say a city man who works in an office. Now the great mistake which my typical man makes in regard to his day is a mistake of general attitude which vitiates two thirds of his energies and interests. In the majority of instances he does not precisely feel a passion for his business. He begins his business functions with reluctance, as late as he can, and he ends them as early as he can. And his engines while he is engaged in his business are seldom at their full horsepower.
Yet in spite of all this he persists in looking upon those hours from nine to five as "the day," to which the ten hours preceding and the six hours following are nothing but a prologue and epilogue. Such an attitude of course kills his interest in the odd 16 hours, with the result that, even if he does not waste them, he does not count them; he regards them simply as margin. If a man makes two thirds of his existence subservient to one third, for which he has no feverish zest, how can he hope to live fully and completely? He cannot.
To live fully and completely he must arrange a day within a day. This inner day must begin at 5 p.m. and end at q a.m. During all these 16 hours he has nothing whatever to do but cultivate his body and his soul and his fellow men. During those 16 hours he is free; he is just as good as a man with a private income. This must be his attitude. And his attitude is all important. His success in life depends on it.
In examining the typical man's method of employing the 16 hours that are entirely his, let me first indicate things which he does which I think he ought not to do.
In justice I must say that he wastes very little time before he leaves the house in the morning at 8: ro. In too many houses he gets up at eight, breakfasts between 8:7 and 8:9 1/2, and then bolts. But immediately he bangs the front door his mental faculties, which are tireless, become idle. He walks or drives to the station in a condition of mental coma. Arrived there, he usually has to wait for the train. At hundreds of suburban stations every morning men calmly stroll

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE To come to grips with what is situation, I must choose a typical case - say a city man who works in an office. Now what is great mistake which my typical man makes in regard to his day is a mistake of general attitude which vitiates two thirds of his energies and interests. In what is majority of instances he does not precisely feel a passion for his business. He begins his business functions with reluctance, as late as he can, and he ends them as early as he can. And his engines while he is engaged in his business are seldom at their full horsepower. Yet in spite of all this he persists in looking upon those hours from nine to five as "the day," to which what is ten hours preceding and what is six hours following are nothing but a prologue and epilogue. Such an attitude of course stop s his interest in what is odd 16 hours, with what is result that, even if he does not waste them, he does not count them; he regards them simply as margin. If a man makes two thirds of his existence subservient to one third, for which he has no feverish zest, how can he hope to live fully and completely? He cannot. To live fully and completely he must arrange a day within a day. This inner day must begin at 5 p.m. and end at q a.m. During all these 16 hours he has nothing whatever to do but cultivate his body and his soul and his fellow men. During those 16 hours he is free; he is just as good as a man with a private income. This must be his attitude. And his attitude is all important. His success in life depends on it. In examining what is typical man's method of employing what is 16 hours that are entirely his, let me first indicate things which he does which I think he ought not to do. In justice I must say that he wastes very little time before he leaves what is house in what is morning at 8: ro. In too many houses he gets up at eight, breakfasts between 8:7 and 8:9 1/2, and then bolts. But immediately he bangs what is front door his mental faculties, which are tireless, become idle. He walks or drives to what is station in a condition of mental coma. Arrived there, he usually has to wait for what is train. At hundreds of suburban stations every morning men calmly stroll where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is p where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 168 where is p align="center" where is strong How To Live On Twenty-Four Hours A Day where is p To come to grips with what is situation, I must choose a typical case - say a city man who works in an office. Now what is great mistake which my typical man makes in regard to his day is a mistake of general attitude which vitiates two thirds of his energies and interests. In what is majority of instances he does not precisely feel a passion for his business. He begins his business functions with reluctance, as late as he can, and he ends them as early as he can. And his engines while he is engaged in his business are seldom at their full horsepower. Yet in spite of all this he persists in looking upon those hours from nine to five as "the day," to which what is ten hours preceding and what is six hours following are nothing but a prologue and epilogue. Such an attitude of course stop s his interest in what is odd 16 hours, with what is result that, even if he does not waste them, he does not count them; he regards them simply as margin. If a man makes two thirds of his existence subservient to one third, for which he has no feverish zest, how can he hope to live fully and completely? He cannot. To live fully and completely he must arrange a day within a day. This inner day must begin at 5 p.m. and end at q a.m. During all these 16 hours he has nothing whatever to do but cultivate his body and his soul and his fellow men. During those 16 hours he is free; he is just as good as a man with a private income. This must be his attitude. And his attitude is all important. His success in life depends on it. In examining what is typical man's method of employing what is 16 hours that are entirely his, let me first indicate things which he does which I think he ought not to do. In justice I must say that he wastes very little time before he leaves what is house in what is morning at 8: ro. In too many houses he gets up at eight, breakfasts between 8:7 and 8:9 1/2, and then bolts. But immediately he bangs what is front door his mental faculties, which are tireless, become idle. He walks or drives to what is station in a condition of mental coma. Arrived there, he usually has to wait for what is train. At hundreds of suburban stations every morning men calmly stroll where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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