Books > Old Books > Getting The Most Out Of Life (1948)


Page 160

LIVE IN "DAY-TIGHT COMPARTMENTS"

King, who directed the U. S. Navy, "and have given them what seems to be the wisest mission. That is all I can do."
Arthur Hays Sulzberger, publisher of the New York Times, told me that he was never able to banish his worries and find peace until he had adopted as his motto the words from a church hymn:

Lead, kindly light ...
Keep thou my feet: I do not ask to see
The distant scene; one step enough for me.

"Think of your life as an hourglass," an Army doctor told a GI who had worried himself into a case of combat fatigue. "The thousands of grains of sand in the top of the hourglass all pass slowly and evenly through the narrow neck in the middle, one grain of sand at a time. You and I and everyone else are like this hourglass. When we start in the morning, there are hundreds of tasks which we feel we must accomplish that day, but if we do not take them one at a time and let them pass through the day slowly and evenly, we are bound to break our own physical or mental structure."
That bit of advice, the young man wrote, not only helped him physically and mentally during the war but has also helped him since in business. "Instead of getting taut and nervous, I remember what the doctor told me. `One grain of sand at a time. One task at a time,' and I accomplish my tasks efficiently and without the confused and jumbled feeling that once almost wrecked me."
We are all standing this very second on the meeting place of two eternities of the past and the future. We can't possibly live in either of those eternities even for one split second; but, by trying to do so, we can wreck both our bodies and our minds. So let's be content to live the only time we can possibly live: from now until bedtime. "Anyone can carry his burden, however hard, until nightfall," wrote Robert Louis Stevenson. "Anyone can live sweetly, patiently, lovingly, purely, till the sun goes down. And this is all that life really means."
One of the most tragic things I know about human nature is that

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE King, who directed what is U. S. Navy, "and have given them what seems to be what is wisest mission. That is all I can do." Arthur Hays Sulzberger, publisher of what is New York Times, told me that he was never able to banish his worries and find peace until he had adopted as his motto what is words from a church hymn: Lead, kindly light ... Keep thou my feet: I do not ask to see what is distant scene; one step enough for me. "Think of your life as an hourglass," an Army doctor told a GI who had worried himself into a case of combat fatigue. "The thousands of grains of sand in what is top of what is hourglass all pass slowly and evenly through what is narrow neck in what is middle, one grain of sand at a time. You and I and everyone else are like this hourglass. When we start in what is morning, there are hundreds of tasks which we feel we must accomplish that day, but if we do not take them one at a time and let them pass through what is day slowly and evenly, we are bound to break our own physical or mental structure." That bit of advice, what is young man wrote, not only helped him physically and mentally during what is war but has also helped him since in business. "Instead of getting taut and nervous, I remember what what is doctor told me. `One grain of sand at a time. One task at a time,' and I accomplish my tasks efficiently and without what is confused and jumbled feeling that once almost wrecked me." We are all standing this very second on what is meeting place of two eternities of what is past and what is future. We can't possibly live in either of those eternities even for one split second; but, by trying to do so, we can wreck both our bodies and our minds. So let's be content to live what is only time we can possibly live: from now until bedtime. "Anyone can carry his burden, however hard, until nightfall," wrote Robert Louis Stevenson. "Anyone can live sweetly, patiently, lovingly, purely, till what is sun goes down. And this is all that life really means." One of what is most tragic things I know about human nature is that where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is p where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 160 where is p align="center" where is strong LIVE IN "DAY-TIGHT COMPARTMENTS" where is p King, who directed what is U. S. Navy, "and have given them what seems to be what is wisest mission. That is all I can do." Arthur Hays Sulzberger, publisher of what is New York Times, told me that he was never able to banish his worries and find peace until he had adopted as his motto what is words from a church hymn: Lead, kindly light ... Keep thou my feet: I do not ask to see what is distant scene; one step enough for me. "Think of your life as an hourglass," an Army doctor told a GI who had worried himself into a case of combat fatigue. "The thousands of grains of sand in what is top of what is hourglass all pass slowly and evenly through what is narrow neck in what is middle, one grain of sand at a time. You and I and everyone else are like this hourglass. When we start in what is morning, there are hundreds of tasks which we feel we must accomplish that day, but if we do not take them one at a time and let them pass through what is day slowly and evenly, we are bound to break our own physical or mental structure." That bit of advice, what is young man wrote, not only helped him physically and mentally during what is war but has also helped him since in business. "Instead of getting taut and nervous, I remember what what is doctor told me. `One grain of sand at a time. One task at a time,' and I accomplish my tasks efficiently and without what is confused and jumbled feeling that once almost wrecked me." We are all standing this very second on what is meeting place of two eternities of what is past and what is future. We can't possibly live in either of those eternities even for one split second; but, by trying to do so, we can wreck both our bodies and our minds. So let's be content to live what is only time we can possibly live: from now until bedtime. "Anyone can carry his burden, however hard, until nightfall," wrote Robert Louis Stevenson. "Anyone can live sweetly, patiently, lovingly, purely, till what is sun goes down. And this is all that life really means." One of what is most tragic things I know about human nature is that where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: _SiteMap , default , 001 , 002 , 003 , 004 , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 ,