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Page 155

Peace Of Mind

creative, growing universe might well have hidden unsuspected continents beyond the perception of our senses.
Moreover, man displays perhaps his most remarkable and his most unselfish genius when he turns from the thought of individual immortality and finds inspiration in the immortality of the human race. As we link ourselves to the heroes and sages and martyrs, the poets and thinkers of every race, we come to share the wisest thoughts, the noblest ideals, the imperishable music of the centuries. Poor, indeed, is the man who lives only in his own time. Rich is he who participates in the riches of the past and the promises of the future.
Both science and religion teach us, at last, that the obstacles to serenity are not external. They lie within ourselves.
If we acquire the art of proper self-love; if, aided by religion, we free ourselves from shadow fears, and learn honestly to face grief and to transcend it; if we flee from immaturity and boldly shoulder adult responsibility; if we appraise and accept ourselves as we really are, how then can we fail to create a good life for ourselves? For then inward peace will be ours.

original Material-Copyright 1946, Joshua Loth Liebman, and published at $2.5o by Simon and
Schuster, Inc., 1230 Sixth Ave., New York 20, N. Y.
Condensed Version-Copyright 1946, The Reader's Digest Assn.. Inc., (The Reader's Digest, May, '46)

OuT OF long, painful experience Abraham Lincoln wrote five sentences which all of us would do well to study. "If I tried to read, much less answer, all the criticisms made of me and all the attacks
leveled against me, this office would have to be closed for all other business. I do the best I know how, the very best I can. I mean to keep on doing this, down to the very end. If the end brings me out all wrong, then ten angels swearing I had been right would make no difference. If the end brings me out all right, then what is said against me now will not amount to any

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE creative, growing universe might well have hidden unsuspected continents beyond what is perception of our senses. Moreover, man displays perhaps his most remarkable and his most unselfish genius when he turns from what is thought of individual immortality and finds inspiration in what is immortality of what is human race. As we where are they now ourselves to what is heroes and sages and martyrs, what is poets and thinkers of every race, we come to share what is wisest thoughts, what is noblest ideals, what is imperishable music of what is centuries. Poor, indeed, is what is man who lives only in his own time. Rich is he who participates in what is riches of what is past and what is promises of what is future. Both science and religion teach us, at last, that what is obstacles to serenity are not external. They lie within ourselves. If we acquire what is art of proper self-love; if, aided by religion, we free ourselves from shadow fears, and learn honestly to face grief and to transcend it; if we flee from immaturity and boldly shoulder where is it responsibility; if we appraise and accept ourselves as we really are, how then can we fail to create a good life for ourselves? For then inward peace will be ours. original Material-Copyright 1946, Joshua Loth Liebman, and published at $2.5o by Simon and Schuster, Inc., 1230 Sixth Ave., New York 20, N. Y. Condensed Version-Copyright 1946, what is Reader's Digest Assn.. Inc., (The Reader's Digest, May, '46) OuT OF long, painful experience Abraham Lincoln wrote five sentences which all of us would do well to study. "If I tried to read, much less answer, all what is criticisms made of me and all what is attacks leveled against me, this office would have to be closed for all other business. I do what is best I know how, what is very best I can. I mean to keep on doing this, down to what is very end. If what is end brings me out all wrong, then ten angels swearing I had been right would make no difference. If what is end brings me out all right, then what is said against me now will not amount to any where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is p where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 155 where is p align="center" where is strong Peace Of Mind where is p creative, growing universe might well have hidden unsuspected continents beyond what is perception of our senses. Moreover, man displays perhaps his most remarkable and his most unselfish genius when he turns from what is thought of individual immortality and finds inspiration in what is immortality of what is human race. As we where are they now ourselves to what is heroes and sages and martyrs, what is poets and thinkers of every race, we come to share what is wisest thoughts, what is noblest ideals, what is imperishable music of what is centuries. Poor, indeed, is what is man who lives only in his own time. Rich is he who participates in what is riches of what is past and what is promises of what is future. Both science and religion teach us, at last, that what is obstacles to serenity are not external. They lie within ourselves. If we acquire what is art of proper self-love; if, aided by religion, we free ourselves from shadow fears, and learn honestly to face grief and to transcend it; if we flee from immaturity and boldly shoulder where is it responsibility; if we appraise and accept ourselves as we really are, how then can we fail to create a good life for ourselves? For then inward peace will be ours. original Material-Copyright 1946, Joshua Loth Liebman, and published at $2.5o by Simon and Schuster, Inc., 1230 Sixth Ave., New York 20, N. Y. Condensed Version-Copyright 1946, what is Reader's Digest Assn.. Inc., (The Reader's Digest, May, '46) OuT OF long, painful experience Abraham Lincoln wrote five sentences which all of us would do well to study. "If I tried to read, much less answer, all what is criticisms made of me and all what is attacks leveled against me, this office would have to be closed for all other business. I do what is best I know how, what is very best I can. I mean to keep on doing this, down to what is very end. If what is end brings me out all wrong, then ten angels swearing I had been right would make no difference. If what is end brings me out all right, then what is said against me now will not amount to any where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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