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Page 152

Peace Of Mind

Every normal person experiences countless fears and worries. But it is possible to master these enemies of serenity.
It is true in a sense that man is blessed by his capacity to know fear. Fear is often the stimulus to growth, the goad to invention. Moreover, fear experienced in the presence of real danger is desirable. But are not most of our fears groundless? Scrutinize that large body of fears coming under the heading of "personal anxiety." Sometimes we are afraid about our health; we worry about our hearts, our lungs, our blood pressure, our insomnia. Or we become concerned about our personalities. Let us look at these anxieties in the light of maturity, see that our neighbors are no less fallible than ourselves, and realize further that in the adult world we should not expect to be coddled as we were in childhood.
A source of hope lies also in the fact that our moods are temporary. This is a hard lesson to learn. When we are tired, every pinprick becomes the stab of a knife. But it is natural and normal to have depressed moods, and we should always remember that we will come out into the light again. We human beings are very tough organisms, able to withstand many shocks, to shed many tears, to live through many tragedies without breaking. Let us learn not to take the depression of the day or month as the permanent state of our life.
It is natural to experience fear concerning our economic and social future. Americans particularly are engaged in a marathon race in which the runners are extremely anxious about those panting at their heels and envious of those ahead. This relentless race for economic success is the source of many breakdowns and premature cardiac deaths.
A yearning for achievement is an admirable attribute of human nature. Where, then, do we go wrong? We err in the excessive energy that we devote not to real accomplishment but to neurotic combat. A man may have a home, possessions, a charming family, and yet find all these things ashy to his taste because he has been outstripped by some other runners in the race for material things. It is not that

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Every normal person experiences countless fears and worries. But it is possible to master these enemies of serenity. It is true in a sense that man is blessed by his capacity to know fear. Fear is often what is stimulus to growth, what is goad to invention. Moreover, fear experienced in what is presence of real danger is desirable. But are not most of our fears groundless? Scrutinize that large body of fears coming under what is heading of "personal anxiety." Sometimes we are afraid about our health; we worry about our hearts, our lungs, our blood pressure, our insomnia. Or we become concerned about our personalities. Let us look at these anxieties in what is light of maturity, see that our neighbors are no less fallible than ourselves, and realize further that in what is where is it world we should not expect to be coddled as we were in childhood. A source of hope lies also in what is fact that our moods are temporary. This is a hard lesson to learn. When we are tired, every pinprick becomes what is stab of a knife. But it is natural and normal to have depressed moods, and we should always remember that we will come out into what is light again. We human beings are very tough organisms, able to withstand many shocks, to shed many tears, to live through many tragedies without breaking. Let us learn not to take what is depression of what is day or month as what is permanent state of our life. It is natural to experience fear concerning our economic and social future. Americans particularly are engaged in a marathon race in which what is runners are extremely anxious about those panting at their heels and envious of those ahead. This relentless race for economic success is what is source of many breakdowns and premature cardiac what time is it s. A yearning for achievement is an admirable attribute of human nature. Where, then, do we go wrong? We err in what is excessive energy that we devote not to real accomplishment but to neurotic combat. A man may have a home, possessions, a charming family, and yet find all these things ashy to his taste because he has been outstripped by some other runners in what is race for material things. It is not that where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is p where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 152 where is p align="center" where is strong Peace Of Mind where is p Every normal person experiences countless fears and worries. But it is possible to master these enemies of serenity. It is true in a sense that man is blessed by his capacity to know fear. Fear is often what is stimulus to growth, what is goad to invention. Moreover, fear experienced in what is presence of real danger is desirable. But are not most of our fears groundless? Scrutinize that large body of fears coming under what is heading of "personal anxiety." Sometimes we are afraid about our health; we worry about our hearts, our lungs, our blood pressure, our insomnia. Or we become concerned about our personalities. Let us look at these anxieties in what is light of maturity, see that our neighbors are no less fallible than ourselves, and realize further that in what is where is it world we should not expect to be coddled as we were in childhood. A source of hope lies also in what is fact that our moods are temporary. This is a hard lesson to learn. When we are tired, every pinprick becomes what is stab of a knife. But it is natural and normal to have depressed moods, and we should always remember that we will come out into what is light again. We human beings are very tough organisms, able to withstand many shocks, to shed many tears, to live through many tragedies without breaking. Let us learn not to take what is depression of what is day or month as what is permanent state of our life. It is natural to experience fear concerning our economic and social future. Americans particularly are engaged in a marathon race in which what is runners are extremely anxious about those panting at their heels and envious of those ahead. This relentless race for economic success is what is source of many breakdowns and premature cardiac what time is it s. A yearning for achievement is an admirable attribute of human nature. Where, then, do we go wrong? We err in what is excessive energy that we devote not to real accomplishment but to neurotic combat. A man may have a home, possessions, a charming family, and yet find all these things ashy to his taste because he has been outstripped by some other runners in what is race for material things. It is not that where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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