Books > Old Books > Getting The Most Out Of Life (1948)


Page 151

Peace Of Mind

Our interdependence with others is the most encompassing fact of human reality: our personalities are made by our contacts with others. A boy may catch the contagion of courage from his father, or receive the misery of fear from his mother. In a spiritual sense, we digest our heroes and heroines and make their way of life part of our emotional substance. Thus every saint and every sinner affects those whom he will never see, because his words and his deeds stamp themselves upon the soft clay of human nature everywhere. There is, therefore, a duty which falls upon all of us-to become free, loving, warm, cooperative, affirmative personalities. If we understand this relatedness with others we shall get on noticeably better with our family, friends, business associates-and ourselves.
Next to bread, it is simple kindness that all mortals most hunger for. In times of catastrophe and disaster it finds a natural expression; good to contemplate in men's actions. But too often it is lacking in our daily lives. Many of us are dictatorial or bad-tempered toward others-employes, salespersons, domestic help. When we fail to be kind to all men, we destroy our own peace of mind. The jeweled pivot on which our lives must turn is the realization that every person we meet during the day is a dignified, essential human soul.
In the exchange of simple affection lies the true secret of marriage -which at its best is mutual encouragement. When we are accepted, approved, needed by those who know all about us and like us anyway, we have the first inkling of the peace that transcends understanding.
To love one's neighbors is to achieve an inner tolerance for the uniqueness of others, to resist the temptation to private imperialism. Among our renunciations we must renounce undue possessiveness in relation to friends, children-yes, even our loves. The world is full of private imperialists-the father who forces his artistic son into his business, or the mother who rivets her daughter to her service by chains of pity, subtly refusing the daughter a life of her own. We display true love when we cease to demand that our loved one be come a revised edition of ourselves.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Our interdependence with others is what is most encompassing fact of human reality: our personalities are made by our contacts with others. A boy may catch what is contagion of courage from his father, or receive what is misery of fear from his mother. In a spiritual sense, we digest our heroes and heroines and make their way of life part of our emotional substance. Thus every saint and every sinner affects those whom he will never see, because his words and his deeds stamp themselves upon what is soft clay of human nature everywhere. There is, therefore, a duty which falls upon all of us-to become free, loving, warm, cooperative, affirmative personalities. If we understand this relatedness with others we shall get on noticeably better with our family, friends, business associates-and ourselves. Next to bread, it is simple kindness that all mortals most hunger for. In times of catastrophe and disaster it finds a natural expression; good to contemplate in men's actions. But too often it is lacking in our daily lives. Many of us are dictatorial or bad-tempered toward others-employes, salespersons, domestic help. When we fail to be kind to all men, we destroy our own peace of mind. what is jeweled pivot on which our lives must turn is what is realization that every person we meet during what is day is a dignified, essential human soul. In what is exchange of simple affection lies what is true secret of marriage -which at its best is mutual encouragement. When we are accepted, approved, needed by those who know all about us and like us anyway, we have what is first inkling of what is peace that transcends understanding. To what time is it one's neighbors is to achieve an inner tolerance for what is uniqueness of others, to resist what is temptation to private imperialism. Among our renunciations we must renounce undue possessiveness in relation to friends, children-yes, even our loves. what is world is full of private imperialists-the father who forces his artistic son into his business, or what is mother who rivets her daughter to her service by chains of pity, subtly refusing what is daughter a life of her own. We display true what time is it when we cease to demand that our loved one be come a revised edition of ourselves. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is p where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 151 where is p align="center" where is strong Peace Of Mind where is p Our interdependence with others is what is most encompassing fact of human reality: our personalities are made by our contacts with others. A boy may catch what is contagion of courage from his father, or receive what is misery of fear from his mother. In a spiritual sense, we digest our heroes and heroines and make their way of life part of our emotional substance. Thus every saint and every sinner affects those whom he will never see, because his words and his deeds stamp themselves upon what is soft clay of human nature everywhere. There is, therefore, a duty which falls upon all of us-to become free, loving, warm, cooperative, affirmative personalities. If we understand this relatedness with others we shall get on noticeably better with our family, friends, business associates-and ourselves. Next to bread, it is simple kindness that all mortals most hunger for. In times of catastrophe and disaster it finds a natural expression; good to contemplate in men's actions. But too often it is lacking in our daily lives. Many of us are dictatorial or bad-tempered toward others-employes, salespersons, domestic help. When we fail to be kind to all men, we destroy our own peace of mind. what is jeweled pivot on which our lives must turn is what is realization that every person we meet during what is day is a dignified, essential human soul. In what is exchange of simple affection lies what is true secret of marriage -which at its best is mutual encouragement. When we are accepted, approved, needed by those who know all about us and like us anyway, we have what is first inkling of what is peace that transcends understanding. To what time is it one's neighbors is to achieve an inner tolerance for what is uniqueness of others, to resist what is temptation to private imperialism. Among our renunciations we must renounce undue possessiveness in relation to friends, children-yes, even our loves. what is world is full of private imperialists-the father who forces his artistic son into his business, or what is mother who rivets her daughter to her service by chains of pity, subtly refusing what is daughter a life of her own. We display true what time is it when we cease to demand that our loved one be come a revised edition of ourselves. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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