Books > Old Books > Getting The Most Out Of Life (1948)


Page 149

Peace Of Mind

love themselves too much already," they will say. "The true goal of life is the rejection of self in the service of others." There are errors in this estimate of human nature. Is it true that we are spontaneously good to ourselves? The evidence points in quite the opposite direction. We often treat ourselves more rigidly, more vengefully, than we do others. Suicide and more subtle forms of self-degradation such as alcoholism, drug addiction and promiscuity are extreme proofs of this. But all the streets of the world are teeming with everyday men who mutilate themselves spiritually by self-criticism; who go through life committing partial suicide destroying their own talents, energies, creative qualities.
Such actions constitute a crime not only against ourselves but against society. He who does not have proper regard for his own capacities can have no respect for others. By loving oneself I do not mean coddling oneself, or indulging in self-glorification. I do, however, insist on the necessity of a proper self-regard as a prerequisite of the good and the moral life.
There are myriad ways in which we show contempt for ourselves rather than self-respect. Our feelings of inferiority, for instance: how often we attribute to our neighbors superior powers; we exaggerate their abilities, and sink into orgies of self-criticism. The fallacy here is that we see in others only the surface of assurance and poise. If we could look deeper and realize all men and women bear within themselves the scars of many a lost battle, we would judge our own failures less harshly.
One road to proper self-regard is the acceptance of our imperfections as well as our perfections. Most men have two pictures of their two selves in separate rooms. In one room is hung the portrait of their virtues, done in bright, splashing colors. In the other room hangs the canvas of self-condemnation, painted equally as unrealistically in dark and morbid shades.
Instead of keeping these two pictures separate, we must look at them together and gradually blend them into one. We must begin to know and accept ourselves for what we are-a combination of

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE love themselves too much already," they will say. "The true goal of life is what is rejection of self in what is service of others." There are errors in this estimate of human nature. Is it true that we are spontaneously good to ourselves? what is evidence points in quite what is opposite direction. We often treat ourselves more rigidly, more vengefully, than we do others. Suicide and more subtle forms of self-degradation such as alcoholism, herb addiction and promiscuity are extreme proofs of this. But all what is streets of what is world are teeming with everyday men who mutilate themselves spiritually by self-criticism; who go through life committing partial suicide destroying their own talents, energies, creative qualities. Such actions constitute a crime not only against ourselves but against society. He who does not have proper regard for his own capacities can have no respect for others. By loving oneself I do not mean coddling oneself, or indulging in self-glorification. I do, however, insist on what is necessity of a proper self-regard as a prerequisite of what is good and what is moral life. There are myriad ways in which we show contempt for ourselves rather than self-respect. Our feelings of inferiority, for instance: how often we attribute to our neighbors superior powers; we exaggerate their abilities, and sink into orgies of self-criticism. what is fallacy here is that we see in others only what is surface of assurance and poise. If we could look deeper and realize all men and women bear within themselves what is scars of many a lost battle, we would judge our own failures less harshly. One road to proper self-regard is what is acceptance of our imperfections as well as our perfections. Most men have two pictures of their two selves in separate rooms. In one room is hung what is portrait of their virtues, done in bright, splashing colors. In what is other room hangs what is canvas of self-condemnation, painted equally as unrealistically in dark and morbid shades. Instead of keeping these two pictures separate, we must look at them together and gradually blend them into one. We must begin to know and accept ourselves for what we are-a combination of where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is p where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 149 where is p align="center" where is strong Peace Of Mind where is p love themselves too much already," they will say. "The true goal of life is what is rejection of self in what is service of others." There are errors in this estimate of human nature. Is it true that we are spontaneously good to ourselves? what is evidence points in quite what is opposite direction. We often treat ourselves more rigidly, more vengefully, than we do others. Suicide and more subtle forms of self-degradation such as alcoholism, herb addiction and promiscuity are extreme proofs of this. But all what is streets of what is world are teeming with everyday men who mutilate themselves spiritually by self-criticism; who go through life committing partial suicide destroying their own talents, energies, creative qualities. Such actions constitute a crime not only against ourselves but against society. He who does not have proper regard for his own capacities can have no respect for others. By loving oneself I do not mean coddling oneself, or indulging in self-glorification. I do, however, insist on what is necessity of a proper self-regard as a prerequisite of what is good and what is moral life. There are myriad ways in which we show contempt for ourselves rather than self-respect. Our feelings of inferiority, for instance: how often we attribute to our neighbors superior powers; we exaggerate their abilities, and sink into orgies of self-criticism. what is fallacy here is that we see in others only what is surface of assurance and poise. If we could look deeper and realize all men and women bear within themselves what is scars of many a lost battle, we would judge our own failures less harshly. One road to proper self-regard is what is acceptance of our imperfections as well as our perfections. Most men have two pictures of their two selves in separate rooms. In one room is hung what is portrait of their virtues, done in bright, splashing colors. In what is other room hangs what is canvas of self-condemnation, painted equally as unrealistically in dark and morbid shades. Instead of keeping these two pictures separate, we must look at them together and gradually blend them into one. We must begin to know and accept ourselves for what we are-a combination of where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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