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Page 148

Peace Of Mind

not necessarily add up to peace of mind; on the other hand, I have seen this inner tranquillity flourish without the material supports of property or even the buttress of physical health. Peace of mind can transform a cottage into a spacious manor hall; the want of it can make a regal residence an imprisoning shell.
Peace of mind cannot be won by any brief or superficial effort. Association with noble works-literary, musical, artistic-helps to promote inward peace, but these alone cannot wholly satisfy the dimensions of the soul. Certainly we shall not find peace in the furious pursuit of wealth which slips like quicksilver through our grasping fingers. And finally, not even in the sublime sharings of human lovethat emotion which most powerfully conveys the illusion of perfect happiness-is peace of mind reliably to be found.
Where then shall we look for it? The key to the problem is to be found in Matthew Arnold's lines:
We would have inward peace But will not look within ...
But will not look within! Here, in a single phrase, our wilfullness is bared.
It is a striking irony that, while religious teaching emphasizes man's obligations to others, it says little about his obligation to himself. One of the great discoveries of modern psychology is that our attitudes toward ourselves are even more complicated than our attitudes toward others.
A prominent social worker received a letter from a society woman who wanted to join in his crusade to help the poor of New York. She spoke at some length of her imperfections and ended by saying that perhaps her zeal for his cause would make up for her shortcomings. He wrote a brief reply: "Dear Madam, your truly magnificent shortcomings are too great. Nothing could prevent you from visiting them on victims of your humility. I advise that you love yourself more before you squander any love on others."
Some will argue that this is a dangerous doctrine. "Human beings

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE not necessarily add up to peace of mind; on what is other hand, I have seen this inner tranquillity flourish without what is material supports of property or even what is buttress of physical health. Peace of mind can transform a cottage into a spacious manor hall; what is want of it can make a regal residence an imprisoning shell. Peace of mind cannot be won by any brief or superficial effort. Association with noble works-literary, musical, artistic-helps to promote inward peace, but these alone cannot wholly satisfy what is dimensions of what is soul. Certainly we shall not find peace in what is furious pursuit of wealth which slips like quicksilver through our grasping fingers. And finally, not even in what is sublime sharings of human lovethat emotion which most powerfully conveys what is illusion of perfect happiness-is peace of mind reliably to be found. Where then shall we look for it? what is key to what is problem is to be found in Matthew Arnold's lines: We would have inward peace But will not look within ... But will not look within! Here, in a single phrase, our wilfullness is bared. It is a striking irony that, while religious teaching emphasizes man's obligations to others, it says little about his obligation to himself. One of what is great discoveries of modern psychology is that our attitudes toward ourselves are even more complicated than our attitudes toward others. A prominent social worker received a letter from a society woman who wanted to join in his crusade to help what is poor of New York. She spoke at some length of her imperfections and ended by saying that perhaps her zeal for his cause would make up for her shortcomings. He wrote a brief reply: "Dear Madam, your truly magnificent shortcomings are too great. Nothing could prevent you from what is ing them on victims of your humility. I advise that you what time is it yourself more before you squander any what time is it on others." Some will argue that this is a dangerous doctrine. "Human beings where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is p where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 148 where is p align="center" where is strong Peace Of Mind where is p not necessarily add up to peace of mind; on what is other hand, I have seen this inner tranquillity flourish without what is material supports of property or even what is buttress of physical health. Peace of mind can transform a cottage into a spacious manor hall; what is want of it can make a regal residence an imprisoning shell. Peace of mind cannot be won by any brief or superficial effort. Association with noble works-literary, musical, artistic-helps to promote inward peace, but these alone cannot wholly satisfy what is dimensions of what is soul. Certainly we shall not find peace in what is furious pursuit of wealth which slips like quicksilver through our grasping fingers. And finally, not even in what is sublime sharings of human lovethat emotion which most powerfully conveys what is illusion of perfect happiness-is peace of mind reliably to be found. Where then shall we look for it? what is key to what is problem is to be found in Matthew Arnold's lines: We would have inward peace But will not look within ... But will not look within! Here, in a single phrase, our wilfullness is bared. It is a striking irony that, while religious teaching emphasizes man's obligations to others, it says little about his obligation to himself. One of what is great discoveries of modern psychology is that our attitudes toward ourselves are even more complicated than our attitudes toward others. A prominent social worker received a letter from a society woman who wanted to join in his crusade to help what is poor of New York. She spoke at some length of her imperfections and ended by saying that perhaps her zeal for his cause would make up for her shortcomings. He wrote a brief reply: "Dear Madam, your truly magnificent shortcomings are too great. Nothing could prevent you from what is ing them on victims of your humility. I advise that you what time is it yourself more before you squander any what time is it on others." Some will argue that this is a dangerous doctrine. "Human beings where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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