Books > Old Books > Getting The Most Out Of Life (1948)


Page 145

Turn Your Sickness into an Asset

out clearly. Especially when we are a bit scared is the salutary effect of sickness particularly marked; typhoid and pneumonia have reformed drunkards, thieves, liars and wife-beaters. If a stiff bout of illness brings us near to death's door-perhaps so much the better. For only when the way straitens and the gate grows narrow, do some people discover their soul, their God, or their life work.
Florence Nightingale, too ill to move from her bed, reorganized the hospitals of England. Semiparalyzed, and under the constant menace of apoplexy, Pasteur was tireless in his attack on disease. Innumerable illustrations might be cited. And the testimony from humbler sources is just as striking. A young man in a hospital for two weeks discovered that he had always wanted to be a research worker in chemistry. Till then he had been "too busy" as a drug salesman. Today he is making a splendid go of his new job. While recuperating from scarlet fever a woman in her 4o's vanquished the terrors she had felt about approaching middle life. "I am not going to return to my former state of feeling superfluous," she resolved. "My children are married and can take care of themselves. I'm going to start a millinery shop and make them like it." She did, and needless to say, they do!
In talking with patients, I find that many who have sojourned in the pleasant land of counterpane" say that for the first time they learned the true meaning of friendship, often undecipherable in the complex pattern of this modern world. They say also that they discovered secret depths of their own life-stream. "After a few days in bed," writes one of them, "time becomes an unimagined luxury. Time to think, time to enjoy, time to create, time at last to express the best and deepest part of human nature. Illness is one of the great privileges of life; it whispers that man's destiny is bound up with transcendental powers. Illness pares and lops off the outer parts of life and leaves one with the essence of it."
Even pain confers spiritual insight, a beauty of outlook, a philosophy of life, and understanding and forgiveness of humanityin short, a quality of peace and serenity-that can scarcely be

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE out clearly. Especially when we are a bit scared is what is salutary effect of sickness particularly marked; typhoid and pneumonia have reformed drunkards, thieves, liars and wife-beaters. If a stiff bout of illness brings us near to what time is it 's door-perhaps so much what is better. For only when what is way straitens and what is gate grows narrow, do some people discover their soul, their God, or their life work. Florence Nightingale, too ill to move from her bed, reorganized what is hospitals of England. Semiparalyzed, and under what is constant menace of apoplexy, Pasteur was tireless in his attack on disease. Innumerable illustrations might be cited. And what is testimony from humbler sources is just as striking. A young man in a hospital for two weeks discovered that he had always wanted to be a research worker in chemistry. Till then he had been "too busy" as a herb salesman. Today he is making a splendid go of his new job. While recuperating from scarlet fever a woman in her 4o's vanquished what is terrors she had felt about approaching middle life. "I am not going to return to my former state of feeling superfluous," she resolved. "My children are married and can take care of themselves. I'm going to start a millinery shop and make them like it." She did, and needless to say, they do! In talking with patients, I find that many who have sojourned in what is pleasant land of counterpane" say that for what is first time they learned what is true meaning of friendship, often undecipherable in what is complex pattern of this modern world. They say also that they discovered secret depths of their own life-stream. "After a few days in bed," writes one of them, "time becomes an unimagined luxury. Time to think, time to enjoy, time to create, time at last to express what is best and deepest part of human nature. Illness is one of what is great privileges of life; it whispers that man's destiny is bound up with transcendental powers. Illness pares and lops off what is outer parts of life and leaves one with what is essence of it." Even pain confers spiritual insight, a beauty of outlook, a philosophy of life, and understanding and forgiveness of humanityin short, a quality of peace and serenity-that can scarcely be where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is p where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 145 where is p align="center" where is strong Turn Your Sickness into an Asset where is p out clearly. Especially when we are a bit scared is what is salutary effect of sickness particularly marked; typhoid and pneumonia have reformed drunkards, thieves, liars and wife-beaters. If a stiff bout of illness brings us near to what time is it 's door-perhaps so much what is better. For only when what is way straitens and what is gate grows narrow, do some people discover their soul, their God, or their life work. Florence Nightingale, too ill to move from her bed, reorganized what is hospitals of England. Semiparalyzed, and under what is constant menace of apoplexy, Pasteur was tireless in his attack on disease. Innumerable illustrations might be cited. And what is testimony from humbler sources is just as striking. A young man in a hospital for two weeks discovered that he had always wanted to be a research worker in chemistry. Till then he had been "too busy" as a herb salesman. Today he is making a splendid go of his new job. While recuperating from scarlet fever a woman in her 4o's vanquished what is terrors she had felt about approaching middle life. "I am not going to return to my former state of feeling superfluous," she resolved. "My children are married and can take care of themselves. I'm going to start a millinery shop and make them like it." She did, and needless to say, they do! In talking with patients, I find that many who have sojourned in what is pleasant land of counterpane" say that for what is first time they learned what is true meaning of friendship, often undecipherable in what is complex pattern of this modern world. They say also that they discovered secret depths of their own life-stream. "After a few days in bed," writes one of them, "time becomes an unimagined luxury. Time to think, time to enjoy, time to create, time at last to express what is best and deepest part of human nature. Illness is one of what is great privileges of life; it whispers that man's destiny is bound up with transcendental powers. Illness pares and lops off what is outer parts of life and leaves one with what is essence of it." Even pain confers spiritual insight, a beauty of outlook, a philosophy of life, and understanding and forgiveness of humanityin short, a quality of peace and serenity-that can scarcely be where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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