Books > Old Books > Getting The Most Out Of Life (1948)


Page 144

Turn Your Sickness into an Asset

But our interest here centers on the ordinary mortal stricken for the first time. These sick-chamber casuals rarely learn to make the most of illness, regarding it only as a visitation of bad luck. Yet thousands actually have found themselves for the first time during sickness. The "beloved physician," Dr. Edward Livingston Trudeau, was sent, as a young doctor, to the mountains where he expected to die of tuberculosis. But he did not die. As he lay in bed he had a vision of a great hospital where he could rebuild other sufferers. Flat on his back, he examined patients not as ill as himself. He raised money and labored until his dream became the great sanatorium at Saranac that has helped thousands of tuberculosis patients. Trudeau's affliction turned an unknown doctor into a physician of world-wide fame.
Eugene O'Neill was an utter drifter with no plan of life until he was 25. A serious breakdown gave him the requisite leisure, he says, "to evaluate the impressions of many years in which experiences had crowded one upon the other, with never a second's reflection." It was in the hospital that he first began to write the plays that revolutionized American drama.
Like any major experience, illness actually changes us. How? Well, for one thing we are temporarily relieved from the terrible pressure of meeting the world head-on. Responsibility melts away like snow on an April roof; we don't have to catch trains, tend babies, or wind the clock. We enter a realm of introspection and self-analysis. We think soberly, perhaps for the first time, about our past and future. Former values are seen to be fallacious; habitual courses of action appear weak, foolish or stubborn. Illness, it seems, gives us that rarest thing in the world-a second chance, not only at health but at life itself!
Illness knocks a lot of nonsense out of us; it induces humility, cuts us down to our own size. It enables us to throw a searchlight upon our inner selves and to discover how often we have rationalized our failures and weaknesses, dodged vital issues and run skulkingly away. Mistakes made in our jobs, marriage and social contacts stand

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE But our interest here centers on what is ordinary mortal stricken for what is first time. These sick-chamber casuals rarely learn to make what is most of illness, regarding it only as a what is ation of bad luck. Yet thousands actually have found themselves for what is first time during sickness. what is "beloved physician," Dr. Edward Livingston Trudeau, was sent, as a young doctor, to what is mountains where he expected to travel of tuberculosis. But he did not die. As he lay in bed he had a vision of a great hospital where he could rebuild other sufferers. Flat on his back, he examined patients not as ill as himself. He raised money and labored until his dream became what is great sanatorium at Saranac that has helped thousands of tuberculosis patients. Trudeau's affliction turned an unknown doctor into a physician of world-wide fame. Eugene O'Neill was an utter drifter with no plan of life until he was 25. A serious breakdown gave him what is requisite leisure, he says, "to evaluate what is impressions of many years in which experiences had crowded one upon what is other, with never a second's reflection." It was in what is hospital that he first began to write what is plays that revolutionized American drama. Like any major experience, illness actually changes us. How? Well, for one thing we are temporarily relieved from what is terrible pressure of meeting what is world head-on. Responsibility melts away like snow on an April roof; we don't have to catch trains, tend babies, or wind what is clock. We enter a realm of introspection and self-analysis. We think soberly, perhaps for what is first time, about our past and future. Former values are seen to be fallacious; habitual courses of action appear weak, foolish or stubborn. Illness, it seems, gives us that rarest thing in what is world-a second chance, not only at health but at life itself! Illness knocks a lot of nonsense out of us; it induces humility, cuts us down to our own size. It enables us to throw a searchlight upon our inner selves and to discover how often we have rationalized our failures and weaknesses, dodged vital issues and run skulkingly away. Mistakes made in our jobs, marriage and social contacts stand where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is p where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 144 where is p align="center" where is strong Turn Your Sickness into an Asset where is p But our interest here centers on what is ordinary mortal stricken for what is first time. These sick-chamber casuals rarely learn to make what is most of illness, regarding it only as a what is ation of bad luck. Yet thousands actually have found themselves for what is first time during sickness. what is "beloved physician," Dr. Edward Livingston Trudeau, was sent, as a young doctor, to what is mountains where he expected to travel of tuberculosis. But he did not die. As he lay in bed he had a vision of a great hospital where he could rebuild other sufferers. Flat on his back, he examined patients not as ill as himself. He raised money and labored until his dream became what is great sanatorium at Saranac that has helped thousands of tuberculosis patients. Trudeau's affliction turned an unknown doctor into a physician of world-wide fame. Eugene O'Neill was an utter drifter with no plan of life until he was 25. A serious breakdown gave him what is requisite leisure, he says, "to evaluate what is impressions of many years in which experiences had crowded one upon what is other, with never a second's reflection." It was in what is hospital that he first began to write what is plays that revolutionized American drama. Like any major experience, illness actually changes us. How? Well, for one thing we are temporarily relieved from what is terrible pressure of meeting what is world head-on. Responsibility melts away like snow on an April roof; we don't have to catch trains, tend babies, or wind what is clock. We enter a realm of introspection and self-analysis. We think soberly, perhaps for what is first time, about our past and future. Former values are seen to be fallacious; habitual courses of action appear weak, foolish or stubborn. Illness, it seems, gives us that rarest thing in what is world-a second chance, not only at health but at life itself! Illness knocks a lot of nonsense out of us; it induces humility, cuts us down to our own size. It enables us to throw a searchlight upon our inner selves and to discover how often we have rationalized our failures and weaknesses, dodged vital issues and run skulkingly away. Mistakes made in our jobs, marriage and social contacts stand where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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