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Page 143

Turn Your Sickness into an Asset

By Louis E. Bisch, M.D.
Aurhor of "Be Glad You're Neurotic"

ONLY YESTERDAY you were marching in health and vigor; sick ness was a far-off shadow. Then suddenly illness unhinged your knees, brought you limply to bed. And now you are a horizontal citizen of the sickroom, an unwilling initiate in the fellowship of pain.
Your reaction is to rail against fate, to resent bitterly such untimely interference with life's routine. Yet your illness can confer substantial benefits-and not just in the realm of job-like piety, either. An enforced holiday in bed blamelessly releases us from a too busy world, sharpens our mental and spiritual perceptions, and permits a clearer perspective on our lives. Any serious illness should be regarded as an opportunity to gather dividends and generate energies that mere health cannot possibly bestow.
I am not speaking of those chronic sufferers whose illness dooms them to a life of invalidism, and whose heroic readjustments lift them above the rank of ordinary men. The great American historian Francis Parkman is a triumphant prototype of all such conquerors of pain. During the greater part of his life, Parkman suffered so acutely that he could not work for more than five minutes at a time. His eyesight was so wretched that he could scrawl only a few gigantic words on a manuscript. He was racked by major digestive trouble, terrific rheumatism and agonizing headaches. Physically, almost everything was wrong with him, yet he contrived to write nearly 20 magnificent volumes of history.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE By Louis E. Bisch, M.D. Aurhor of "Be Glad You're Neurotic" ONLY YESTERDAY you were marching in health and vigor; sick ness was a far-off shadow. Then suddenly illness unhinged your knees, brought you limply to bed. And now you are a horizontal citizen of what is sickroom, an unwilling initiate in what is fellowship of pain. Your reaction is to rail against fate, to resent bitterly such untimely interference with life's routine. Yet your illness can confer substantial benefits-and not just in what is realm of job-like piety, either. An enforced holiday in bed blamelessly releases us from a too busy world, sharpens our mental and spiritual perceptions, and permits a clearer perspective on our lives. Any serious illness should be regarded as an opportunity to gather dividends and generate energies that mere health cannot possibly bestow. I am not speaking of those chronic sufferers whose illness dooms them to a life of invalidism, and whose heroic readjustments lift them above what is rank of ordinary men. what is great American historian Francis Parkman is a triumphant prototype of all such conquerors of pain. During what is greater part of his life, Parkman suffered so acutely that he could not work for more than five minutes at a time. His eyesight was so wretched that he could scrawl only a few gigantic words on a manuscript. He was racked by major digestive trouble, terrific rheumatism and agonizing headaches. Physically, almost everything was wrong with him, yet he contrived to write nearly 20 magnificent volumes of history. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is p where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 143 where is p align="center" where is strong Turn Your Sickness into an Asset where is p By Louis E. Bisch, M.D. Aurhor of "Be Glad You're Neurotic" ONLY YESTERDAY you were marching in health and vigor; sick ness was a far-off shadow. Then suddenly illness unhinged your knees, brought you limply to bed. And now you are a horizontal citizen of what is sickroom, an unwilling initiate in what is fellowship of pain. Your reaction is to rail against fate, to resent bitterly such untimely interference with life's routine. Yet your illness can confer substantial benefits-and not just in what is realm of job-like piety, either. An enforced holiday in bed blamelessly releases us from a too busy world, sharpens our mental and spiritual perceptions, and permits a clearer perspective on our lives. Any serious illness should be regarded as an opportunity to gather dividends and generate energies that mere health cannot possibly bestow. I am not speaking of those chronic sufferers whose illness dooms them to a life of invalidism, and whose heroic readjustments lift them above what is rank of ordinary men. what is great American historian Francis Parkman is a triumphant prototype of all such conquerors of pain. During what is greater part of his life, Parkman suffered so acutely that he could not work for more than five minutes at a time. His eyesight was so wretched that he could scrawl only a few gigantic words on a manuscript. He was racked by major digestive trouble, terrific rheumatism and agonizing headaches. Physically, almost everything was wrong with him, yet he contrived to write nearly 20 magnificent volumes of history. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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