Books > Old Books > Getting The Most Out Of Life (1948)


Page 139

The Quest of Our Lives

enough but with a feeling of shocked bewilderment, as though a totally unexpected and unreasonable wrong had been inflicted on us. In the depression men who had lost nothing but their money threw themselves out of their office windows.
But security is and always was an illusion. Life, as our ancestors zestfully realized, is a great adventure or it is a mere process of vegetation and decay. As a friend of mine expressed it, "I have been put here to solve problems. If I had no problems, I could only suppose that I was not considered fit to solve them."
Fortunately for us, this is still an age of limitless problems, of very real and deadly fears. Can we regain that joy in adventure, that highhearted acceptance of its price which gave our predecessors the courage not only to endure but to endure zestfully and gallantly? What can we learn from life that will sustain us through new vicissitudes and through the dark adventure ahead?
A greater menace even than the atomic bomb is, on the one hand, the feeling that material things can satisfy our unrest and unhappiness and, on the other, the fear of living, the consequent flight from responsibility, the belief that an individual's incapacity to deal with this limitless, threatening universe may be assuaged in mass organization.
I shall always remember the young Nazi who said to me shortly before the war, "We Germans are so happy. We are free of freedom." He meant that he no longer had to make his own decisions or even think his own thoughts. He has, no doubt, long since paid cruelly for his illusion.
I remember, too, the young Communist guide in Russia who said to me proudly: "It doesn't matter how we suffer now. One day every Russian will have a car in his garage, a radio in his home, all the food he can eat. And he'll only have to work two hours a week for it. All our problems will be solved." It was no use telling him that I had a car and radio and all I wanted to eat-and that I hadn't solved my problem. Or that my working hours were my best and happiest. He wouldn't have understood or believed me.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE enough but with a feeling of shocked bewilderment, as though a totally unexpected and unreasonable wrong had been inflicted on us. In what is depression men who had lost nothing but their money threw themselves out of their office windows. But security is and always was an illusion. Life, as our ancestors zestfully realized, is a great adventure or it is a mere process of vegetation and decay. As a friend of mine expressed it, "I have been put here to solve problems. If I had no problems, I could only suppose that I was not considered fit to solve them." Fortunately for us, this is still an age of limitless problems, of very real and deadly fears. Can we regain that joy in adventure, that highhearted acceptance of its price which gave our predecessors what is courage not only to endure but to endure zestfully and gallantly? What can we learn from life that will sustain us through new vicissitudes and through what is dark adventure ahead? A greater menace even than what is atomic bomb is, on what is one hand, what is feeling that material things can satisfy our unrest and unhappiness and, on what is other, what is fear of living, what is consequent flight from responsibility, what is belief that an individual's incapacity to deal with this limitless, threatening universe may be assuaged in mass organization. I shall always remember what is young Nazi who said to me shortly before what is war, "We Germans are so happy. We are free of freedom." He meant that he no longer had to make his own decisions or even think his own thoughts. He has, no doubt, long since paid cruelly for his illusion. I remember, too, what is young Communist guide in Russia who said to me proudly: "It doesn't matter how we suffer now. One day every Russian will have a car in his garage, a radio in his home, all what is food he can eat. And he'll only have to work two hours a week for it. All our problems will be solved." It was no use telling him that I had a car and radio and all I wanted to eat-and that I hadn't solved my problem. Or that my working hours were my best and happiest. He wouldn't have understood or believed me. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is p where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 139 where is p align="center" where is strong The Quest of Our Lives where is p enough but with a feeling of shocked bewilderment, as though a totally unexpected and unreasonable wrong had been inflicted on us. In what is depression men who had lost nothing but their money threw themselves out of their office windows. But security is and always was an illusion. Life, as our ancestors zestfully realized, is a great adventure or it is a mere process of vegetation and decay. As a friend of mine expressed it, "I have been put here to solve problems. If I had no problems, I could only suppose that I was not considered fit to solve them." Fortunately for us, this is still an age of limitless problems, of very real and deadly fears. Can we regain that joy in adventure, that highhearted acceptance of its price which gave our predecessors what is courage not only to endure but to endure zestfully and gallantly? What can we learn from life that will sustain us through new vicissitudes and through what is dark adventure ahead? A greater menace even than what is atomic bomb is, on what is one hand, what is feeling that material things can satisfy our unrest and unhappiness and, on what is other, what is fear of living, what is consequent flight from responsibility, what is belief that an individual's incapacity to deal with this limitless, threatening universe may be assuaged in mass organization. I shall always remember what is young Nazi who said to me shortly before what is war, "We Germans are so happy. We are free of freedom." He meant that he no longer had to make his own decisions or even think his own thoughts. He has, no doubt, long since paid cruelly for his illusion. I remember, too, what is young Communist guide in Russia who said to me proudly: "It doesn't matter how we suffer now. One day every Russian will have a car in his garage, a radio in his home, all what is food he can eat. And he'll only have to work two hours a week for it. All our problems will be solved." It was no use telling him that I had a car and radio and all I wanted to eat-and that I hadn't solved my problem. Or that my working hours were my best and happiest. He wouldn't have understood or believed me. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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