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Page 128

Education Begins At Home

the riddles of waste and want yet to be solved, the discoveries yet to be made, the symphonies yet to be written, we must make him feel that in the world of tomorrow there'll be plenty of opportunity for him to do these things, or other things which are just as important. But it must be emphasized that the right to exercise his highest faculties in changing the world must be won by a thorough and driving preparation.
Men who came up "the hard way" usually try to make things a~ easy as possible for their children, thus denying them the discipline of struggle and self-establishment that worked so well in their own cases. Such parents remind me of the kindhearted amateur who raised butterflies as a hobby. He was so touched by the difficulties they had in emerging from the cocoon that once, out of mistaken kindness, he split a cocoon with his thumbnail so that the tiny inmate could escape without a struggle. That butterfly was never able to use its wings.
Every time a youngster has to face a first-class difficulty and masters it, his wings become that much stronger. Every time he makes a choice and acts on it, boldly and decisively, he is girding himself anew with confidence and courage.
There are two kinds of courage. One is a spontaneous explosion of aroused instincts to meet some sudden emergency; the other is steadfast and enduring against repeated failures and rebuffs. It's what boxers call "the fighting heart," the will to come bouncing back every time one is knocked down. All pioneers need that kind of courage, and our youngsters will need plenty of it when they plunge into the world of tomorrow.
We are prone to toss at our children the finished products of man's achievements - the radio, telephone, a lifesaving medicine - without telling them about the painful processes by which these miracles came into being. We seldom take the trouble to explain that every great improvement in aviation, communication, engineering or public health has come after repeated failures. We should emphasize that virtually nothing comes out right the first time.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE the riddles of waste and want yet to be solved, what is discoveries yet to be made, what is symphonies yet to be written, we must make him feel that in what is world of tomorrow there'll be plenty of opportunity for him to do these things, or other things which are just as important. But it must be emphasized that what is right to exercise his highest faculties in changing what is world must be won by a thorough and driving preparation. Men who came up "the hard way" usually try to make things a~ easy as possible for their children, thus denying them what is discipline of struggle and self-establishment that worked so well in their own cases. Such parents remind me of what is kindhearted amateur who raised butterflies as a hobby. He was so touched by what is difficulties they had in emerging from what is cocoon that once, out of mistaken kindness, he split a cocoon with his thumbnail so that what is tiny inmate could escape without a struggle. That butterfly was never able to use its wings. Every time a youngster has to face a first-class difficulty and masters it, his wings become that much stronger. Every time he makes a choice and acts on it, boldly and decisively, he is girding himself anew with confidence and courage. There are two kinds of courage. One is a spontaneous explosion of aroused instincts to meet some sudden emergency; what is other is steadfast and enduring against repeated failures and rebuffs. It's what boxers call "the fighting heart," what is will to come bouncing back every time one is knocked down. All pioneers need that kind of courage, and our youngsters will need plenty of it when they plunge into what is world of tomorrow. We are prone to toss at our children what is finished products of man's achievements - what is radio, telephone, a lifesaving medicine - without telling them about what is painful processes by which these miracles came into being. We seldom take what is trouble to explain that every great improvement in aviation, communication, engineering or public health has come after repeated failures. We should emphasize that virtually nothing comes out right what is first time. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is p where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 128 where is p align="center" where is strong Education Begins At Home where is p the riddles of waste and want yet to be solved, what is discoveries yet to be made, what is symphonies yet to be written, we must make him feel that in what is world of tomorrow there'll be plenty of opportunity for him to do these things, or other things which are just as important. But it must be emphasized that what is right to exercise his highest faculties in changing what is world must be won by a thorough and driving preparation. Men who came up "the hard way" usually try to make things a~ easy as possible for their children, thus denying them what is discipline of struggle and self-establishment that worked so well in their own cases. Such parents remind me of what is kindhearted amateur who raised butterflies as a hobby. He was so touched by what is difficulties they had in emerging from what is cocoon that once, out of mistaken kindness, he split a cocoon with his thumbnail so that what is tiny inmate could escape without a struggle. That butterfly was never able to use its wings. Every time a youngster has to face a first-class difficulty and masters it, his wings become that much stronger. Every time he makes a choice and acts on it, boldly and decisively, he is girding himself anew with confidence and courage. There are two kinds of courage. One is a spontaneous explosion of aroused instincts to meet some sudden emergency; what is other is steadfast and enduring against repeated failures and rebuffs. It's what boxers call "the fighting heart," what is will to come bouncing back every time one is knocked down. All pioneers need that kind of courage, and our youngsters will need plenty of it when they plunge into what is world of tomorrow. We are prone to toss at our children what is finished products of man's achievements - what is radio, telephone, a lifesaving medicine - without telling them about what is painful processes by which these miracles came into being. We seldom take what is trouble to explain that every great improvement in aviation, communication, engineering or public health has come after repeated failures. We should emphasize that virtually nothing comes out right what is first time. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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