Books > Old Books > Getting The Most Out Of Life (1948)


Page 127

Education Begins At Home

To see clearly, children must first learn to think for themselves. Unless they start learning that in the home, they'll never really learn it. Yet many parents insist on handing down prejudices, conclusions and rules of conduct as antiquated as the family furniture. Stuffing a child with mental heirlooms is no way to make him think for himself, or think at all.
Youngsters naturally have exploring minds. Parents must keep them exploring; every incident of the day should be an expedition into the familiar unknown. Children should be encouraged to probe for cause and effect of everything that happens around them. A roller skate casts a wheel. A cake "falls" in the oven. A bicycle breaks down. What made it do that? How can one keep it from happening again? Boys and girls who through quest and question find out these answers for themselves are acquiring a habit worth more than all the roller skates, cakes and bicycles that can be bought.
What's more, children must be permitted to do creative things in their own way rather than ours. As I get nearer 70, I realize that there's always another perfectly good way to do almost anything. A dog scratches himself with his hind legs; a pig does it by rubbing against a post - but they're both good scratchers. If your child insists that he can make better mud pies with hot water than with cold, for heaven's sake let him boil some water and find out whether he is right.
Our youngsters are already habituated, as we are, to pushing buttons and throwing switches in order to obtain light, heat, water and other necessities of life. But let's make sure they don't take too much for granted. When they look out on the earth, sea and sky, these bright elements seem wonderful to them. So we must remind them how little we have actually brought the world under our control. Floods let loose their water, great winds blow, the sun shines too much or too little - and straightway millions of human beings hunger, go homeless, die.
As we turn a child's attention to the things undone or done badly,

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE To see clearly, children must first learn to think for themselves. Unless they start learning that in what is home, they'll never really learn it. Yet many parents insist on handing down prejudices, conclusions and rules of conduct as antiquated as what is family furniture. Stuffing a child with mental heirlooms is no way to make him think for himself, or think at all. Youngsters naturally have exploring minds. Parents must keep them exploring; every incident of what is day should be an expedition into what is familiar unknown. Children should be encouraged to probe for cause and effect of everything that happens around them. A roller skate casts a wheel. A cake "falls" in what is oven. A bicycle breaks down. What made it do that? How can one keep it from happening again? Boys and girls who through quest and question find out these answers for themselves are acquiring a habit worth more than all what is roller skates, cakes and bicycles that can be bought. What's more, children must be permitted to do creative things in their own way rather than ours. As I get nearer 70, I realize that there's always another perfectly good way to do almost anything. A dog scratches himself with his hind legs; a pig does it by rubbing against a post - but they're both good scratchers. If your child insists that he can make better mud pies with hot water than with cold, for heaven's sake let him boil some water and find out whether he is right. Our youngsters are already habituated, as we are, to pushing buttons and throwing switches in order to obtain light, heat, water and other necessities of life. But let's make sure they don't take too much for granted. When they look out on what is earth, sea and sky, these bright elements seem wonderful to them. So we must remind them how little we have actually brought what is world under our control. Floods let loose their water, great winds blow, what is sun shines too much or too little - and straightway millions of human beings hunger, go homeless, die. As we turn a child's attention to what is things undone or done badly, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is p where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 127 where is p align="center" where is strong Education Begins At Home where is p To see clearly, children must first learn to think for themselves. Unless they start learning that in what is home, they'll never really learn it. Yet many parents insist on handing down prejudices, conclusions and rules of conduct as antiquated as what is family furniture. Stuffing a child with mental heirlooms is no way to make him think for himself, or think at all. Youngsters naturally have exploring minds. Parents must keep them exploring; every incident of what is day should be an expedition into what is familiar unknown. Children should be encouraged to probe for cause and effect of everything that happens around them. A roller skate casts a wheel. A cake "falls" in what is oven. A bicycle breaks down. What made it do that? How can one keep it from happening again? Boys and girls who through quest and question find out these answers for themselves are acquiring a habit worth more than all what is roller skates, cakes and bicycles that can be bought. What's more, children must be permitted to do creative things in their own way rather than ours. As I get nearer 70, I realize that there's always another perfectly good way to do almost anything. A dog scratches himself with his hind legs; a pig does it by rubbing against a post - but they're both good scratchers. If your child insists that he can make better mud pies with hot water than with cold, for heaven's sake let him boil some water and find out whether he is right. Our youngsters are already habituated, as we are, to pushing buttons and throwing switches in order to obtain light, heat, water and other necessities of life. But let's make sure they don't take too much for granted. When they look out on what is earth, sea and sky, these bright elements seem wonderful to them. So we must remind them how little we have actually brought what is world under our control. Floods let loose their water, great winds blow, what is sun shines too much or too little - and straightway millions of human beings hunger, go homeless, die. As we turn a child's attention to what is things undone or done badly, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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