Books > Old Books > Getting The Most Out Of Life (1948)


Page 117

TRY GIVING YOURSELF AWAY

So I wrote a letter to one of the world's most famous department stores, outlining the idea and presenting it to them. It was immediately adopted with appreciation, and now I have a big department store as a friend. Simple appreciation, for example, is one of the most acceptable forms of giving-away. I have found that authors, actors, lecturers, public servants-even the biggest of them-are hungry for genuine expressions of approval. We think of them as being smothered with appreciation, whereas all too often they live on crumbs. The manufactured publicity that is created to promote them does not warm their hearts. What they crave is the spontaneous human, friendly appreciation of the people they are trying to serve.
The other day I was in a hotel dining room where an orchestra was playing. It was a good orchestra, offering well-chosen selections, well played. On the way out impulse prompted me to stop and say, "Gentlemen, I have thoroughly enjoyed your playing." For a second they looked almost startled. Then all of their faces broke into smiles and I left them beaming over their instruments. My own day went off better for it, too.
Another discovery I have made is that it is almost impossible to give away anything in this world without getting something backprovided you are not trying to get something. Usually the return comes in some utterly unexpected form, and it is likely to be months or years later.
For example, one Sunday morning the local post office delivered an important special-delivery letter to my home, though it was addressed to me at my office, and the post office had discharged its obligation by attempting to deliver it there. I wrote the postmaster a note of appreciation. More than a year later I needed a post-office box for a new business I was starting. I was told at the window that there were no boxes left, that my name would have to go on a long waiting list. As I was about to leave, the postmaster appeared in the doorway. He had overheard the conversation. "Wasn't it you who wrote us that letter a year ago about delivering a special delivery to your home?"

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE So I wrote a letter to one of what is world's most famous department stores, outlining what is idea and presenting it to them. It was immediately adopted with appreciation, and now I have a big department store as a friend. Simple appreciation, for example, is one of what is most acceptable forms of giving-away. I have found that authors, actors, lecturers, public servants-even what is biggest of them-are hungry for genuine expressions of approval. We think of them as being smothered with appreciation, whereas all too often they live on crumbs. what is manufactured publicity that is created to promote them does not warm their hearts. What they crave is what is spontaneous human, friendly appreciation of what is people they are trying to serve. what is other day I was in a hotel dining room where an orchestra was playing. It was a good orchestra, offering well-chosen selections, well played. On what is way out impulse prompted me to stop and say, "Gentlemen, I have thoroughly enjoyed your playing." For a second they looked almost startled. Then all of their faces broke into smiles and I left them beaming over their instruments. My own day went off better for it, too. Another discovery I have made is that it is almost impossible to give away anything in this world without getting something backprovided you are not trying to get something. Usually what is return comes in some utterly unexpected form, and it is likely to be months or years later. For example, one Sunday morning what is local post office delivered an important special-delivery letter to my home, though it was addressed to me at my office, and what is post office had discharged its obligation by attempting to deliver it there. I wrote what is postmaster a note of appreciation. More than a year later I needed a post-office box for a new business I was starting. I was told at what is window that there were no boxes left, that my name would have to go on a long waiting list. As I was about to leave, what is postmaster appeared in what is doorway. He had overheard what is conversation. "Wasn't it you who wrote us that letter a year ago about delivering a special delivery to your home?" where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is p where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 117 where is p align="center" where is strong TRY GIVING YOURSELF AWAY where is p So I wrote a letter to one of what is world's most famous department stores, outlining what is idea and presenting it to them. It was immediately adopted with appreciation, and now I have a big department store as a friend. Simple appreciation, for example, is one of what is most acceptable forms of giving-away. I have found that authors, actors, lecturers, public servants-even what is biggest of them-are hungry for genuine expressions of approval. We think of them as being smothered with appreciation, whereas all too often they live on crumbs. what is manufactured publicity that is created to promote them does not warm their hearts. What they crave is what is spontaneous human, friendly appreciation of what is people they are trying to serve. what is other day I was in a hotel dining room where an orchestra was playing. It was a good orchestra, offering well-chosen selections, well played. On what is way out impulse prompted me to stop and say, "Gentlemen, I have thoroughly enjoyed your playing." For a second they looked almost startled. Then all of their faces broke into smiles and I left them beaming over their instruments. My own day went off better for it, too. Another discovery I have made is that it is almost impossible to give away anything in this world without getting something backprovided you are not trying to get something. Usually what is return comes in some utterly unexpected form, and it is likely to be months or years later. For example, one Sunday morning what is local post office delivered an important special-delivery letter to my home, though it was addressed to me at my office, and what is post office had discharged its obligation by attempting to deliver it there. I wrote what is postmaster a note of appreciation. More than a year later I needed a post-office box for a new business I was starting. I was told at what is window that there were no boxes left, that my name would have to go on a long waiting list. As I was about to leave, what is postmaster appeared in what is doorway. He had overheard what is conversation. "Wasn't it you who wrote us that letter a year ago about delivering a special delivery to your home?" where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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