Books > Old Books > Getting The Most Out Of Life (1948)


Page 111

TAKE A DEEP BREATH

much rear expansion you get, put your hands at the small of your back, thumbs forward, middle fingers touching behind. Give yourself a tight squeeze, exhaling as much as you can. Then inhale and see how far you can force your hands apart. Your ribs are a flexible cage that protects your lungs. As your lungs expand, the bony cage should expand all around.
"Ordinary breathing should be unconscious," says Dr. Eugene Lyman Fisk, "but deep-breathing exercises should be employed every day. People who are shut in all day may partly compensate for the evils of indoor living by stepping out of doors and taking a dozen deep breaths whenever the opportunity presents itself."
Without the help of your diaphragm you can never breathe as you should. The diaphragm is the floor of the chest-aa domeshaped muscle, with the dome inverted. As we inhale, the dome drops downward, increasing the chest cavity for the air to rush in. As we exhale, the dome flattens upward, forcing the air out. Without the help of this important muscle you cannot make a sound. You cannot pant, sigh, cough, grunt or clear your throat. A man's diaphragm is placed lower than a woman's, which gives his chest more room; and his active habits of iife have made this muscle stronger. Women are apt to neglect their diaphragms.
Happily, nature taught us how to use the diaphragm. Infants breathe correctly; so do sleeping persons. When we grow up or wake up we allow inhibitions to restrict free diaphragmatic action. A good way to re-educate your diaphragm is to lie flat on your back, discard care and let the great muscle work naturally. If you do this until it becomes a habit you will breathe this way on your feet.
The only purpose of breathing is to get oxygen into our systems, for without oxygen we should quickly die. Every vital process in the body is dependent on oxygen for its performance. The more oxygen you have, the brighter will be your color, the more pep you will have; the smarter you'll be.

Original Article-Copyright 1931, The Crowell-Collier Pub. Co., 250 Park Ave., New York 17, N.Y. (Collier's, June 20, '31)
Condensed Version-Copyright x93I. The Reader's Digest Assn., Inc. (The Reader's Digest, August,'31)

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE much rear expansion you get, put your hands at what is small of your back, thumbs forward, middle fingers touching behind. Give yourself a tight squeeze, exhaling as much as you can. Then inhale and see how far you can force your hands apart. Your ribs are a flexible cage that protects your lungs. As your lungs expand, what is bony cage should expand all around. "Ordinary breathing should be unconscious," says Dr. Eugene Lyman Fisk, "but deep-breathing exercises should be employed every day. People who are shut in all day may partly compensate for what is evils of indoor living by stepping out of doors and taking a dozen deep breaths whenever what is opportunity presents itself." Without what is help of your diaphragm you can never breathe as you should. what is diaphragm is what is floor of what is chest-aa domeshaped muscle, with what is dome inverted. As we inhale, what is dome drops downward, increasing what is chest cavity for what is air to rush in. As we exhale, what is dome flattens upward, forcing what is air out. Without what is help of this important muscle you cannot make a sound. You cannot pant, sigh, cough, grunt or clear your throat. A man's diaphragm is placed lower than a woman's, which gives his chest more room; and his active habits of iife have made this muscle stronger. Women are apt to neglect their diaphragms. Happily, nature taught us how to use what is diaphragm. Infants breathe correctly; so do sleeping persons. When we grow up or wake up we allow inhibitions to restrict free diaphragmatic action. A good way to re-educate your diaphragm is to lie flat on your back, discard care and let what is great muscle work naturally. If you do this until it becomes a habit you will breathe this way on your feet. what is only purpose of breathing is to get oxygen into our systems, for without oxygen we should quickly die. Every vital process in what is body is dependent on oxygen for its performance. what is more oxygen you have, what is brighter will be your color, what is more pep you will have; what is smarter you'll be. Original Article-Copyright 1931, what is Crowell-Collier Pub. Co., 250 Park Ave., New York 17, N.Y. (Collier's, June 20, '31) Condensed Version-Copyright x93I. what is Reader's Digest Assn., Inc. (The Reader's Digest, August,'31) where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is p where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 111 where is p align="center" where is strong TAKE A DEEP BREATH where is p much rear expansion you get, put your hands at what is small of your back, thumbs forward, middle fingers touching behind. Give yourself a tight squeeze, exhaling as much as you can. Then inhale and see how far you can force your hands apart. Your ribs are a flexible cage that protects your lungs. As your lungs expand, what is bony cage should expand all around. "Ordinary breathing should be unconscious," says Dr. Eugene Lyman Fisk, "but deep-breathing exercises should be employed every day. People who are shut in all day may partly compensate for what is evils of indoor living by stepping out of doors and taking a dozen deep breaths whenever what is opportunity presents itself." Without what is help of your diaphragm you can never breathe as you should. what is diaphragm is what is floor of what is chest-aa domeshaped muscle, with what is dome inverted. As we inhale, what is dome drops downward, increasing what is chest cavity for what is air to rush in. As we exhale, what is dome flattens upward, forcing what is air out. Without what is help of this important muscle you cannot make a sound. You cannot pant, sigh, cough, grunt or clear your throat. A man's diaphragm is placed lower than a woman's, which gives his chest more room; and his active habits of iife have made this muscle stronger. Women are apt to neglect their diaphragms. Happily, nature taught us how to use what is diaphragm. Infants breathe correctly; so do sleeping persons. When we grow up or wake up we allow inhibitions to restrict free diaphragmatic action. A good way to re-educate your diaphragm is to lie flat on your back, discard care and let what is great muscle work naturally. If you do this until it becomes a habit you will breathe this way on your feet. what is only purpose of breathing is to get oxygen into our systems, for without oxygen we should quickly die. Every vital process in what is body is dependent on oxygen for its performance. what is more oxygen you have, what is brighter will be your color, what is more pep you will have; what is smarter you'll be. Original Article-Copyright 1931, what is Crowell-Collier Pub. Co., 250 Park Ave., New York 17, N.Y. (Collier's, June 20, '31) Condensed Version-Copyright x93I. what is Reader's Digest Assn., Inc. (The Reader's Digest, August,'31) where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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