Books > Old Books > Getting The Most Out Of Life (1948)


Page 104

Three Days To See

The following morning, I should again greet the dawn, anxious to discover new delights, new revelations of beauty. This third day I shall spend in the workaday world, amid the haunts of men. First, I stand at a busy city corner, merely looking at people, trying by sight of them to understand something of their daily lives. I see smiles; and I am happy. I see serious determination, and I am proud. I see suffering, and I am compassionate.
I stroll down Fifth Avenue. I throw my eyes out of focus, so that I see no particular object but only a seething kaleidoscope of color. I am certain that the colors of women's dresses moving in a throng must be a gorgeous spectacle. But perhaps if I had sight I should be like most other women - too interested in styles to give much attention to the splendor of color in the mass.
From Fifth Avenue I make a tour of the city - to the slums, to factories, to parks where children play. I take a stay-at-home trip abroad by visiting the foreign quarters. Always my eyes are open to all the sights of both happiness and misery so that I may probe deep and add to my understanding of how people work and live.
My third day of sight is drawing to an end. Perhaps there are many serious pursuits to which I should devote the few remaining hours, but I am afraid that on the evening of that last day I should again run away to the theater, to a hilariously funny play, so that I might appreciate the overtones of comedy in the human spirit.
At midnight permanent night would close in on me again. Naturally in those three short days I should not have seen all I wanted to see. Only when darkness had again descended upon me should I realize how much I had left unseen.
Perhaps this short outline does not agree with the program you might set for yourself if you knew that you were about to be stricken blind. I am, however, sure that if you faced that fate you would use your eyes as never before. Everything you saw would become dear to you. Your eyes would embrace every object that came within your range of vision. Then, at last, you would really see, and a new world of beauty would open itself before you.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE The following morning, I should again greet what is dawn, anxious to discover new delights, new revelations of beauty. This third day I shall spend in what is workaday world, amid what is haunts of men. First, I stand at a busy city corner, merely looking at people, trying by sight of them to understand something of their daily lives. I see smiles; and I am happy. I see serious determination, and I am proud. I see suffering, and I am compassionate. I stroll down Fifth Avenue. I throw my eyes out of focus, so that I see no particular object but only a seething kaleidoscope of color. I am certain that what is colors of women's dresses moving in a throng must be a gorgeous spectacle. But perhaps if I had sight I should be like most other women - too interested in styles to give much attention to what is splendor of color in what is mass. From Fifth Avenue I make a tour of what is city - to what is slums, to factories, to parks where children play. I take a stay-at-home trip abroad by what is ing what is foreign quarters. Always my eyes are open to all what is sights of both happiness and misery so that I may probe deep and add to my understanding of how people work and live. My third day of sight is drawing to an end. Perhaps there are many serious pursuits to which I should devote what is few remaining hours, but I am afraid that on what is evening of that last day I should again run away to what is theater, to a hilariously funny play, so that I might appreciate what is overtones of comedy in what is human spirit. At midnight permanent night would close in on me again. Naturally in those three short days I should not have seen all I wanted to see. Only when darkness had again descended upon me should I realize how much I had left unseen. Perhaps this short outline does not agree with what is program you might set for yourself if you knew that you were about to be stricken blind. I am, however, sure that if you faced that fate you would use your eyes as never before. Everything you saw would become dear to you. Your eyes would embrace every object that came within your range of vision. Then, at last, you would really see, and a new world of beauty would open itself before you. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is p where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 104 where is p align="center" where is strong Three Days To See where is p The following morning, I should again greet what is dawn, anxious to discover new delights, new revelations of beauty. This third day I shall spend in what is workaday world, amid what is haunts of men. First, I stand at a busy city corner, merely looking at people, trying by sight of them to understand something of their daily lives. I see smiles; and I am happy. I see serious determination, and I am proud. I see suffering, and I am compassionate. I stroll down Fifth Avenue. I throw my eyes out of focus, so that I see no particular object but only a seething kaleidoscope of color. I am certain that what is colors of women's dresses moving in a throng must be a gorgeous spectacle. But perhaps if I had sight I should be like most other women - too interested in styles to give much attention to what is splendor of color in what is mass. From Fifth Avenue I make a tour of what is city - to what is slums, to factories, to parks where children play. I take a stay-at-home trip abroad by what is ing what is foreign quarters. Always my eyes are open to all what is sights of both happiness and misery so that I may probe deep and add to my understanding of how people work and live. My third day of sight is drawing to an end. Perhaps there are many serious pursuits to which I should devote what is few remaining hours, but I am afraid that on what is evening of that last day I should again run away to what is theater, to a hilariously funny play, so that I might appreciate what is overtones of comedy in what is human spirit. At midnight permanent night would close in on me again. Naturally in those three short days I should not have seen all I wanted to see. Only when darkness had again descended upon me should I realize how much I had left unseen. Perhaps this short outline does not agree with what is program you might set for yourself if you knew that you were about to be stricken blind. I am, however, sure that if you faced that fate you would use your eyes as never before. Everything you saw would become dear to you. Your eyes would embrace every object that came within your range of vision. Then, at last, you would really see, and a new world of beauty would open itself before you. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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