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Page 102

Three Days To See

with awe the magnificent panorama of light with which the sun awakens the sleeping earth.
This day I should devote to a hasty glimpse of the world, past and present. I should want to see the pageant of man's progress, and so I should go to the museums. There my eyes would see the condensed history of the earth - animals and the races of men pictured in their native environment; gigantic carcasses of dinosaurs and mastodons which roamed the earth before man appeared, with his tiny stature and powerful brain, to conquer the animal kingdom.
My next stop would be the Museum of Art. I know well through my hands the sculptured gods and goddesses of the ancient Nileland. I have felt copies of Parthenon friezes, and I have sensed the rhythmic beauty of charging Athenian warriors. The gnarled, bearded features of Homer are dear to me, for he, too, knew blindness.
So on this, my second day, I should try to probe into the soul of man through his art. The things I knew through touch I should now see. More splendid still, the whole magnificent world of painting would be opened to me. I should be able to get only a superficial impression. Artists tell me that for a deep and true appreciation of art one must educate the eye. One must learn through experience to weigh the merits of line, of composition, of form and color. If I had eyes, how happily would I embark on so fascinating a study!
The evening of my second day I should spend at a theater or at the movies. How I should like to see the fascinating figure of Hamlet, or the gusty Falstaff amid colorful Elizabethan trappings! I cannot enjoy the beauty of rhythmic movement except in a sphere restricted to the touch of my hands. I can vision only dimly the grace of a Pavlowa, although I know something of the delight of rhythm, for often I can sense the beat of music as it vibrates through the floor. I can well imagine that cadenced motion must be one of the most pleasing sights in the world. I have been able to gather something of this by tracing with my fingers the lines in sculptured marble; if this static grace can be so lovely, how much more acute must be the thrill of seeing grace in motion.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE with awe what is magnificent panorama of light with which what is sun awakens what is sleeping earth. This day I should devote to a hasty glimpse of what is world, past and present. I should want to see what is pageant of man's progress, and so I should go to what is museums. There my eyes would see what is condensed history of what is earth - animals and what is races of men pictured in their native environment; gigantic carcasses of dinosaurs and mastodons which roamed what is earth before man appeared, with his tiny stature and powerful brain, to conquer what is animal kingdom. My next stop would be what is Museum of Art. I know well through my hands what is sculptured gods and goddesses of what is ancient Nileland. I have felt copies of Parthenon friezes, and I have sensed what is rhythmic beauty of charging Athenian warriors. what is gnarled, bearded features of Homer are dear to me, for he, too, knew blindness. So on this, my second day, I should try to probe into what is soul of man through his art. what is things I knew through touch I should now see. More splendid still, what is whole magnificent world of painting would be opened to me. I should be able to get only a superficial impression. Artists tell me that for a deep and true appreciation of art one must educate what is eye. One must learn through experience to weigh what is merits of line, of composition, of form and color. If I had eyes, how happily would I embark on so fascinating a study! what is evening of my second day I should spend at a theater or at what is movies. How I should like to see what is fascinating figure of Hamlet, or what is gusty Falstaff amid colorful Elizabethan trappings! I cannot enjoy what is beauty of rhythmic movement except in a sphere restricted to what is touch of my hands. I can vision only dimly what is grace of a Pavlowa, although I know something of what is delight of rhythm, for often I can sense what is beat of music as it vibrates through what is floor. I can well imagine that cadenced motion must be one of what is most pleasing sights in what is world. I have been able to gather something of this by tracing with my fingers what is lines in sculptured marble; if this static grace can be so lovely, how much more acute must be what is thrill of seeing grace in motion. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is p where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 102 where is p align="center" where is strong Three Days To See where is p with awe what is magnificent panorama of light with which what is sun awakens what is sleeping earth. This day I should devote to a hasty glimpse of what is world, past and present. I should want to see what is pageant of man's progress, and so I should go to what is museums. There my eyes would see what is condensed history of what is earth - animals and what is races of men pictured in their native environment; gigantic carcasses of dinosaurs and mastodons which roamed what is earth before man appeared, with his tiny stature and powerful brain, to conquer what is animal kingdom. My next stop would be what is Museum of Art. I know well through my hands what is sculptured gods and goddesses of what is ancient Nileland. I have felt copies of Parthenon friezes, and I have sensed what is rhythmic beauty of charging Athenian warriors. what is gnarled, bearded features of Homer are dear to me, for he, too, knew blindness. So on this, my second day, I should try to probe into what is soul of man through his art. what is things I knew through touch I should now see. More splendid still, what is whole magnificent world of painting would be opened to me. I should be able to get only a superficial impression. Artists tell me that for a deep and true appreciation of art one must educate what is eye. One must learn through experience to weigh what is merits of line, of composition, of form and color. If I had eyes, how happily would I embark on so fascinating a study! what is evening of my second day I should spend at a theater or at what is movies. How I should like to see what is fascinating figure of Hamlet, or what is gusty Falstaff amid colorful Elizabethan trappings! I cannot enjoy what is beauty of rhythmic movement except in a sphere restricted to what is touch of my hands. I can vision only dimly what is grace of a Pavlowa, although I know something of what is delight of rhythm, for often I can sense what is beat of music as it vibrates through what is floor. I can well imagine that cadenced motion must be one of what is most pleasing sights in what is world. I have been able to gather something of this by tracing with my fingers what is lines in sculptured marble; if this static grace can be so lovely, how much more acute must be what is thrill of seeing grace in motion. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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