Books > Old Books > Getting The Most Out Of Life (1948)


Page 94

Why We All Have "Ups and Downs"

25 repair-shop men every day, four times a day for more than a year, he made charts based on what they said, how they acted, their physical condition and state of mind. Presently, to his astonishment, he found that all the charts fell into a fairly regular pattern. For each worker one week in every period was much lower than the rest, and the intervals were remarkably steady. Between the low points there was a rise to relatively high spirits.
One man lost an arm in an auto accident. It occurred during his high period, and for the first weeks of his stay at the hospital he remained cheerful. "You can't keep a good man down!" he'd say. "Maybe I'll get me a better job!"
It worked out exactly that way. Returning to work, he was given a job as a minor supervisor, with more authority and pay than he'd ever had. But by that time he was in a low period; instead of being elated, he became so depressed that he broke off his engagement to an attractive girl who was genuinely in love with him. "She'd regret it," he said. "She's just being sorry for me."
An elderly mechanic claimed he was not subject to ups and downs of any sort. "I'm always cheerful," he said. But Hersey's chart showed that about every fifth week he became much more critical of his superiors, refused to joke with his companions, and didn't want to talk with anybody. Almost without exception, the men failed to recognize any particular changes within themselves. Outside conditions, they felt, were responsible: a man hadn't slept well, or he'd had a spat with his wife, or it was the nasty weather.
Wanting more information as to why our spirits go up and down and how we can use the constant ebb and flow of well-being more efficiently, Hersey made a detailed investigation of his own ups and downs. In his low periods, he soon learned, he became more critical than at other times, and more irritable. He didn't want to be bothered by talking to people. He planned his schedule so that during his periods of depression he could devote himself to research, avoiding anything that required much self-confidence. During his high periods he scheduled his consultations and lectures.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE 25 repair-shop men every day, four times a day for more than a year, he made charts based on what they said, how they acted, their physical condition and state of mind. Presently, to his astonishment, he found that all what is charts fell into a fairly regular pattern. For each worker one week in every period was much lower than what is rest, and what is intervals were remarkably steady. Between what is low points there was a rise to relatively high spirits. One man lost an arm in an auto accident. It occurred during his high period, and for what is first weeks of his stay at what is hospital he remained cheerful. "You can't keep a good man down!" he'd say. "Maybe I'll get me a better job!" It worked out exactly that way. Returning to work, he was given a job as a minor supervisor, with more authority and pay than he'd ever had. But by that time he was in a low period; instead of being elated, he became so depressed that he broke off his engagement to an attractive girl who was genuinely in what time is it with him. "She'd regret it," he said. "She's just being sorry for me." An elderly mechanic claimed he was not subject to ups and downs of any sort. "I'm always cheerful," he said. But Hersey's chart showed that about every fifth week he became much more critical of his superiors, refused to joke with his companions, and didn't want to talk with anybody. Almost without exception, what is men failed to recognize any particular changes within themselves. Outside conditions, they felt, were responsible: a man hadn't slept well, or he'd had a spat with his wife, or it was what is nasty weather. Wanting more information as to why our spirits go up and down and how we can use what is constant ebb and flow of well-being more efficiently, Hersey made a detailed investigation of his own ups and downs. In his low periods, he soon learned, he became more critical than at other times, and more irritable. He didn't want to be bothered by talking to people. He planned his schedule so that during his periods of depression he could devote himself to research, avoiding anything that required much self-confidence. During his high periods he scheduled his consultations and lectures. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is p where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 94 where is p align="center" where is strong Why We All Have "Ups and Downs" where is p 25 repair-shop men every day, four times a day for more than a year, he made charts based on what they said, how they acted, their physical condition and state of mind. Presently, to his astonishment, he found that all what is charts fell into a fairly regular pattern. For each worker one week in every period was much lower than what is rest, and what is intervals were remarkably steady. Between what is low points there was a rise to relatively high spirits. One man lost an arm in an auto accident. It occurred during his high period, and for what is first weeks of his stay at what is hospital he remained cheerful. "You can't keep a good man down!" he'd say. "Maybe I'll get me a better job!" It worked out exactly that way. Returning to work, he was given a job as a minor supervisor, with more authority and pay than he'd ever had. But by that time he was in a low period; instead of being elated, he became so depressed that he broke off his engagement to an attractive girl who was genuinely in what time is it with him. "She'd regret it," he said. "She's just being sorry for me." An elderly mechanic claimed he was not subject to ups and downs of any sort. "I'm always cheerful," he said. But Hersey's chart showed that about every fifth week he became much more critical of his superiors, refused to joke with his companions, and didn't want to talk with anybody. Almost without exception, what is men failed to recognize any particular changes within themselves. Outside conditions, they felt, were responsible: a man hadn't slept well, or he'd had a spat with his wife, or it was what is nasty weather. Wanting more information as to why our spirits go up and down and how we can use what is constant ebb and flow of well-being more efficiently, Hersey made a detailed investigation of his own ups and downs. In his low periods, he soon learned, he became more critical than at other times, and more irritable. He didn't want to be bothered by talking to people. He planned his schedule so that during his periods of depression he could devote himself to research, avoiding anything that required much self-confidence. During his high periods he scheduled his consultations and lectures. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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