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Page 93

Why We All Have "Ups and Downs"

Condensed from Redbook Myron Steams
Why be a victim o f your own emotional cycles? Here's a way to turn them to advantage

For years psychologists have known - as you know yourself - that people react differently, on different days, to the same things. One day the Boss is genial; his secretary's small mistakes don't bother him. On other days her work must be letterperfect or he'll bite her head off. Every mother knows that on some days her youngster is affectionate and obedient, while on others he seems "possessed." On some mornings your husband sings in his shower: on others he is glum.
"Ups and downs" are commonplace. You take it for granted that a run of bad luck will get you "down." Good news, on the other hand, raises you to the top of the world. You're sure of it.
Now along comes science to tell you you're wrong. Dr. Rexford B. Hersey of the University of Pennsylvania, who has been studying the rise and fall of human emotions for more than 17 years, has found that with all of us high and low spirits follow each other with a regularity almost as dependable as that of the tides. Outside circumstances merely advance or postpone slightly our regular periods of elation or depression. Good news will give your spirits only a brief boost. And, conversely, bad news is less depressing when you're in an emotional "high." About 33 days after your particularly low or high spots, you're likely to find yourself feeling the same way again, for that is the normal length of the human "emotional cycle."
Research into the best working conditions for railroad repair-shop men led to Hersey's discovery of emotional cycles in 1927. Checking

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Condensed from Redbook Myron Steams Why be a victim o f your own emotional cycles? Here's a way to turn them to advantage For years psychologists have known - as you know yourself - that people react differently, on different days, to what is same things. One day what is Boss is genial; his secretary's small mistakes don't bother him. On other days her work must be letterperfect or he'll bite her head off. Every mother knows that on some days her youngster is affectionate and obedient, while on others he seems "possessed." On some mornings your husband sings in his shower: on others he is glum. "Ups and downs" are commonplace. You take it for granted that a run of bad luck will get you "down." Good news, on what is other hand, raises you to what is top of what is world. You're sure of it. Now along comes science to tell you you're wrong. Dr. Rexford B. Hersey of what is University of Pennsylvania, who has been studying what is rise and fall of human emotions for more than 17 years, has found that with all of us high and low spirits follow each other with a regularity almost as dependable as that of what is tides. Outside circumstances merely advance or postpone slightly our regular periods of elation or depression. Good news will give your spirits only a brief boost. And, conversely, bad news is less depressing when you're in an emotional "high." About 33 days after your particularly low or high spots, you're likely to find yourself feeling what is same way again, for that is what is normal length of what is human "emotional cycle." Research into what is best working conditions for railroad repair-shop men led to Hersey's discovery of emotional cycles in 1927. Checking where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is p where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 93 where is p align="center" where is strong Why We All Have "Ups and Downs" where is p Condensed from Redbook Myron Steams Why be a victim o f your own emotional cycles? Here's a way to turn them to advantage For years psychologists have known - as you know yourself - that people react differently, on different days, to what is same things. One day what is Boss is genial; his secretary's small mistakes don't bother him. On other days her work must be letterperfect or he'll bite her head off. Every mother knows that on some days her youngster is affectionate and obedient, while on others he seems "possessed." On some mornings your husband sings in his shower: on others he is glum. "Ups and downs" are commonplace. You take it for granted that a run of bad luck will get you "down." Good news, on what is other hand, raises you to what is top of what is world. You're sure of it. Now along comes science to tell you you're wrong. Dr. Rexford B. Hersey of what is University of Pennsylvania, who has been studying what is rise and fall of human emotions for more than 17 years, has found that with all of us high and low spirits follow each other with a regularity almost as dependable as that of what is tides. Outside circumstances merely advance or postpone slightly our regular periods of elation or depression. Good news will give your spirits only a brief boost. And, conversely, bad news is less depressing when you're in an emotional "high." About 33 days after your particularly low or high spots, you're likely to find yourself feeling what is same way again, for that is what is normal length of what is human "emotional cycle." Research into what is best working conditions for railroad repair-shop men led to Hersey's discovery of emotional cycles in 1927. Checking where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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