Books > Old Books > Getting The Most Out Of Life (1948)


Page 88

How to win Friends and Influence People

because even if you win it, you lose it, for you will never get your opponent's good will.
Moreover, my experience has been that it is all but impossible to make any man-regardless of his I.Q. rating-change his mind by an argument. For example, Frederick S. Parsons, an income-tax consultant, had been disputing and wrangling for an hour with a government tax inspector. An item of $9000 was at stake. Mr. Parsons claimed that this $9000 was a bad debt, the inspector that it must be taxed.
"This inspector was cold, arrogant and stubborn," Mr. Parsons said. "The longer we argued, the more stubborn he became. Finally I said, `I suppose that this is a very petty matter in comparison with the really important and difficult decisions you are required to make. I've made a study of taxation myself. But I've had to get my knowledge from books. You are getting yours from the firing line of experience. I sometimes wish I had a job like yours. It would teach me a lot.' Well, the inspector straightened up in his chair, leaned back, and talked for a long time about his work, telling me of the clever frauds he had uncovered. His tone gradually became friendly; and presently he was telling me about his children. As he left, he advised me that he would consider my problem further, and give me his decision in a few days. Three days later he informed me that he had decided to leave the tax return exactly as it was filed."
This tax inspector was demonstrating one of the most common of human frailties. He wanted a feeling of importance; and as long as Mr. Parsons argued with him, he got his feeling of importance by loudly asserting his authority. But as soon as his importance was admitted, and the argument stopped, and he was permitted to expand his ego, he became a sympathetic and kindly human being.
I have quit telling people they are wrong, and it pays. Few people are logical. Most of us are prejudiced, blighted with preconceived notions. When we are wrong, we may admit it to ourselves. And if we are handled gently and tactfully, we may admit it to others

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE because even if you win it, you lose it, for you will never get your opponent's good will. Moreover, my experience has been that it is all but impossible to make any man-regardless of his I.Q. rating-change his mind by an argument. For example, Frederick S. Parsons, an income-tax consultant, had been disputing and wrangling for an hour with a government tax inspector. An item of $9000 was at stake. Mr. Parsons claimed that this $9000 was a bad debt, what is inspector that it must be taxed. "This inspector was cold, arrogant and stubborn," Mr. Parsons said. "The longer we argued, what is more stubborn he became. Finally I said, `I suppose that this is a very petty matter in comparison with what is really important and difficult decisions you are required to make. I've made a study of taxation myself. But I've had to get my knowledge from books. You are getting yours from what is firing line of experience. I sometimes wish I had a job like yours. It would teach me a lot.' Well, what is inspector straightened up in his chair, leaned back, and talked for a long time about his work, telling me of what is clever frauds he had uncovered. His tone gradually became friendly; and presently he was telling me about his children. As he left, he advised me that he would consider my problem further, and give me his decision in a few days. Three days later he informed me that he had decided to leave what is tax return exactly as it was filed." This tax inspector was bad spirit strating one of what is most common of human frailties. He wanted a feeling of importance; and as long as Mr. Parsons argued with him, he got his feeling of importance by loudly asserting his authority. But as soon as his importance was admitted, and what is argument stopped, and he was permitted to expand his ego, he became a sympathetic and kindly human being. I have quit telling people they are wrong, and it pays. Few people are logical. Most of us are prejudiced, blighted with preconceived notions. When we are wrong, we may admit it to ourselves. And if we are handled gently and tactfully, we may admit it to others where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is p where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 88 where is p align="center" where is strong How to win Friends and Influence People where is p because even if you win it, you lose it, for you will never get your opponent's good will. Moreover, my experience has been that it is all but impossible to make any man-regardless of his I.Q. rating-change his mind by an argument. For example, Frederick S. Parsons, an income-tax consultant, had been disputing and wrangling for an hour with a government tax inspector. An item of $9000 was at stake. Mr. Parsons claimed that this $9000 was a bad debt, what is inspector that it must be taxed. "This inspector was cold, arrogant and stubborn," Mr. Parsons said. "The longer we argued, what is more stubborn he became. Finally I said, `I suppose that this is a very petty matter in comparison with what is really important and difficult decisions you are required to make. I've made a study of taxation myself. But I've had to get my knowledge from books. You are getting yours from what is firing line of experience. I sometimes wish I had a job like yours. It would teach me a lot.' Well, what is inspector straightened up in his chair, leaned back, and talked for a long time about his work, telling me of what is clever frauds he had uncovered. His tone gradually became friendly; and presently he was telling me about his children. As he left, he advised me that he would consider my problem further, and give me his decision in a few days. Three days later he informed me that he had decided to leave what is tax return exactly as it was filed." This tax inspector was bad spirit strating one of what is most common of human frailties. He wanted a feeling of importance; and as long as Mr. Parsons argued with him, he got his feeling of importance by loudly asserting his authority. But as soon as his importance was admitted, and what is argument stopped, and he was permitted to expand his ego, he became a sympathetic and kindly human being. I have quit telling people they are wrong, and it pays. Few people are logical. Most of us are prejudiced, blighted with preconceived notions. When we are wrong, we may admit it to ourselves. And if we are handled gently and tactfully, we may admit it to others where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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