Books > Old Books > Getting The Most Out Of Life (1948)


Page 85

How to win Friends and Influence People

indulge in a little stinging criticism-no matter how certain you are that it is justified.
Benjamin Franklin, tactless in his youth, became so diplomatic, so adroit at handling people that he was made American Ambassador to France. The secret of his success? "I will speak ill of no man," he said, "and speak all the good I know of everybody."
As Dr. Johnson said: "God Himself, sir, does not propose to judge man until the end of his days." Why should you and I?

We Want to Be Important
PROFESSOR John Dewey, the philosopher, says the deepest urge in human nature is the "desire to be important." It was this desire that led the uneducated, poverty-stricken grocery clerk, Abraham Lincoln, to study law; that inspired Dickens to write his immortal novels. It makes you want to wear the latest styles, drive the latest car, and talk about your brilliant children. Some people even become invalids in order to win sympathy and attention, and thus get a feeling of importance.
If people are so hungry for a feeling of importance, imagine what miracles you and I can achieve by giving them honest appreciation. The rare individual who honestly satisfies this heart hunger will hold people in the palm of his hand.
Andrew Carnegie paid Charles Schwab the unprecedented salary of a million dollars a year. Not that Schwab knew more about the manufacture of steel than other people. Schwab told me himself that he had many men working for him who knew more about steel than he did, and that he was paid this salary largely because of his ability to deal with people. What was his secret?
"I consider my ability to arouse enthusiasm among the men," he said, "the greatest asset I possess, and the way to develop the best that is in a man is by appreciation. I am anxious to praise but loath to find fault. I have yet to find the man who did not do better work and put forth greater effort under a spirit of approval than under a spirit of criticism."

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE indulge in a little stinging criticism-no matter how certain you are that it is justified. Benjamin Franklin, tactless in his youth, became so diplomatic, so adroit at handling people that he was made American Ambassador to France. what is secret of his success? "I will speak ill of no man," he said, "and speak all what is good I know of everybody." As Dr. Johnson said: "God Himself, sir, does not propose to judge man until what is end of his days." Why should you and I? We Want to Be Important PROFESSOR John Dewey, what is philosopher, says what is deepest urge in human nature is what is "desire to be important." It was this desire that led what is uneducated, poverty-stricken grocery clerk, Abraham Lincoln, to study law; that inspired Dickens to write his immortal novels. It makes you want to wear what is latest styles, drive what is latest car, and talk about your brilliant children. Some people even become invalids in order to win sympathy and attention, and thus get a feeling of importance. If people are so hungry for a feeling of importance, imagine what miracles you and I can achieve by giving them honest appreciation. what is rare individual who honestly satisfies this heart hunger will hold people in what is palm of his hand. Andrew Carnegie paid Charles Schwab what is unprecedented salary of a million dollars a year. Not that Schwab knew more about what is manufacture of steel than other people. Schwab told me himself that he had many men working for him who knew more about steel than he did, and that he was paid this salary largely because of his ability to deal with people. What was his secret? "I consider my ability to arouse enthusiasm among what is men," he said, "the greatest asset I possess, and what is way to develop what is best that is in a man is by appreciation. I am anxious to praise but loath to find fault. I have yet to find what is man who did not do better work and put forth greater effort under a spirit of approval than under a spirit of criticism." where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is p where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 85 where is p align="center" where is strong How to win Friends and Influence People where is p indulge in a little stinging criticism-no matter how certain you are that it is justified. Benjamin Franklin, tactless in his youth, became so diplomatic, so adroit at handling people that he was made American Ambassador to France. what is secret of his success? "I will speak ill of no man," he said, "and speak all what is good I know of everybody." As Dr. Johnson said: "God Himself, sir, does not propose to judge man until what is end of his days." Why should you and I? We Want to Be Important PROFESSOR John Dewey, what is philosopher, says what is deepest urge in human nature is what is "desire to be important." It was this desire that led what is uneducated, poverty-stricken grocery clerk, Abraham Lincoln, to study law; that inspired Dickens to write his immortal novels. It makes you want to wear what is latest styles, drive what is latest car, and talk about your brilliant children. Some people even become invalids in order to win sympathy and attention, and thus get a feeling of importance. If people are so hungry for a feeling of importance, imagine what miracles you and I can achieve by giving them honest appreciation. what is rare individual who honestly satisfies this heart hunger will hold people in what is palm of his hand. Andrew Carnegie paid Charles Schwab what is unprecedented salary of a million dollars a year. Not that Schwab knew more about what is manufacture of steel than other people. Schwab told me himself that he had many men working for him who knew more about steel than he did, and that he was paid this salary largely because of his ability to deal with people. What was his secret? "I consider my ability to arouse enthusiasm among what is men," he said, "the greatest asset I possess, and what is way to develop what is best that is in a man is by appreciation. I am anxious to praise but loath to find fault. I have yet to find what is man who did not do better work and put forth greater effort under a spirit of approval than under a spirit of criticism." where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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