Books > Old Books > Getting The Most Out Of Life (1948)


Page 76

DO THE THING YOU FEAR

He tried it with such gratifying results that he was encouraged to try more difficult tasks, one conquest leading to another.
The more general fears-of insanity, of persecution, of strangers, of inferiority-are usually the result of one's failure to conquer enough minor fears by such practice. Sometimes, however, they are due to the fact that a person for some reason-disappointment in love, the death of a dear relative, financial reverses, loss of a jobwithdraws from his accustomed activities. After a catastrophe, especially, one should not only keep up old activities but bend his will and energies toward beginning some new and preferably strenuous pursuit. After losing his position, a man of 56 who had been with one company for 30 years began to withdraw from all contacts with his former friends. Within six months he had become a bundle of fears, both small and great. Finally he was persuaded to visit a relative living on a farm. Soon he was drawn into the routine of the establishment. In six months he was himself again.
Although generalizations are dangerous, I venture to say that at the bottom of most fears will be found an overactive mind and an underactive body. Hence, I have advised many people, in their quest for happiness, to use their heads less and their arms and legs more-in useful work or play. We generate fears while we sit; we overcome them by action. Fear is nature's warning signal to get busy.
In its mild and initial stages, fear takes the form of aversion to, or criticism of, certain activities and people, constituting an alibi by which the individual justifies his continued inaction. The world is full of malcontents, parlor communists and social theorists who, because they will not change themselves, talk about changing the entire system. Many of them do not seem to realize that in any social order whatsoever there would still be misfits. Through conversation they rationalize their anger with the world, instead of becoming enraged with themselves and flying into worth-while action.

Copyright 1937. The Reader's Digest Assn.. Inc. (The Reader's Digest, December, '37)

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE He tried it with such gratifying results that he was encouraged to try more difficult tasks, one conquest leading to another. what is more general fears-of insanity, of persecution, of strangers, of inferiority-are usually what is result of one's failure to conquer enough minor fears by such practice. Sometimes, however, they are due to what is fact that a person for some reason-disappointment in love, what is what time is it of a dear relative, financial reverses, loss of a jobwithdraws from his accustomed activities. After a catastrophe, especially, one should not only keep up old activities but bend his will and energies toward beginning some new and preferably strenuous pursuit. After losing his position, a man of 56 who had been with one company for 30 years began to withdraw from all contacts with his former friends. Within six months he had become a bundle of fears, both small and great. Finally he was persuaded to what is a relative living on a farm. Soon he was drawn into what is routine of what is establishment. In six months he was himself again. Although generalizations are dangerous, I venture to say that at what is bottom of most fears will be found an overactive mind and an underactive body. Hence, I have advised many people, in their quest for happiness, to use their heads less and their arms and legs more-in useful work or play. We generate fears while we sit; we overcome them by action. Fear is nature's warning signal to get busy. In its mild and initial stages, fear takes what is form of aversion to, or criticism of, certain activities and people, constituting an alibi by which what is individual justifies his continued inaction. what is world is full of malcontents, parlor communists and social theorists who, because they will not change themselves, talk about changing what is entire system. Many of them do not seem to realize that in any social order whatsoever there would still be misfits. Through conversation they rationalize their anger with what is world, instead of becoming enraged with themselves and flying into worth-while action. Copyright 1937. what is Reader's Digest Assn.. Inc. (The Reader's Digest, December, '37) where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is p where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 76 where is p align="center" where is strong DO what is THING YOU FEAR where is p He tried it with such gratifying results that he was encouraged to try more difficult tasks, one conquest leading to another. what is more general fears-of insanity, of persecution, of strangers, of inferiority-are usually what is result of one's failure to conquer enough minor fears by such practice. Sometimes, however, they are due to what is fact that a person for some reason-disappointment in love, what is what time is it of a dear relative, financial reverses, loss of a jobwithdraws from his accustomed activities. After a catastrophe, especially, one should not only keep up old activities but bend his will and energies toward beginning some new and preferably strenuous pursuit. After losing his position, a man of 56 who had been with one company for 30 years began to withdraw from all contacts with his former friends. Within six months he had become a bundle of fears, both small and great. Finally he was persuaded to what is a relative living on a farm. Soon he was drawn into what is routine of what is establishment. In six months he was himself again. Although generalizations are dangerous, I venture to say that at what is bottom of most fears will be found an overactive mind and an underactive body. Hence, I have advised many people, in their quest for happiness, to use their heads less and their arms and legs more-in useful work or play. We generate fears while we sit; we overcome them by action. Fear is nature's warning signal to get busy. In its mild and initial stages, fear takes what is form of aversion to, or criticism of, certain activities and people, constituting an alibi by which what is individual justifies his continued inaction. what is world is full of malcontents, parlor communists and social theorists who, because they will not change themselves, talk about changing what is entire system. Many of them do not seem to realize that in any social order whatsoever there would still be misfits. Through conversation they rationalize their anger with what is world, instead of becoming enraged with themselves and flying into worth-while action. Copyright 1937. what is Reader's Digest Assn.. Inc. (The Reader's Digest, December, '37) where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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