Books > Old Books > Getting The Most Out Of Life (1948)


Page 72

Savings of Lifetime

Even that competence might be swept away. Well, then, they will still have what is being saved for them every day, what goes not into banks or bonds but into mind, and facility of body, and happiness.
There remains the other problem-that of saving"for myself; for my own old age. I must admit that I find this much less interesting. That independent old lady sketched by the insurance agents isn't nearly the incentive the children are. She may never exist. But still I suppose I must take some thought for the care of her, if only to keep her from being a nuisance to other people. Here again expenditures and savings dovetail. Much of the money put into experiences that are apparently transient I consider savings. The concert, the voyage, the visit with friends-I'm putting by a few of those things as I go along. What does one save for, anyhow? For a few tired hours at the end? Or do we save so that those last years will not be mentally barren or esthetically shabby? I try to save a few things to furnish my mind decently, on the theory that no auctioneer can get in there to sell off all the furniture.
Still, one must be practical. Probably I can save enough for a small income unless things change too radically. But I must be able and content to live on a small income. That means that I had better save all the simple tastes I have. It is a comfort to me that I really enjoy a boiled egg, a cup of tea and a piece of toast. I'm often extravagant about clothes. But I have some historic garments-aa blue bathrobe and a tweed suit-that prove that I can wear things threadbare. I like possessions, but I mean to keep from being dependent on them. I'll scrap the expensive tastes, if I must, and save the frugal ones. And if, in the end, I go over the hill to the poorhouse, I'll go in no slinking spirit. My tax receipts will be clasped to my bosom, and I'll feel at last I'm getting my money's worth!
We worry too much about money and possessions. Is it because we forget that the only thing each man is required to save-the only thing he secretly wants to save is his own soul?

Original Article - Copyright 1933. The Curtis Pub. Co., Independence Square, Philadelphia S. Pa. (The aturday Evening Post, March 18,'33)
Condensed Version - Copyright 1934. The Reader's Digest Assn., Inc. (-The Reader's Digest, February, '34)

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Even that competence might be swept away. Well, then, they will still have what is being saved for them every day, what goes not into banks or bonds but into mind, and facility of body, and happiness. There remains what is other problem-that of saving"for myself; for my own old age. I must admit that I find this much less interesting. That independent old lady sketched by what is insurance agents isn't nearly what is incentive what is children are. She may never exist. But still I suppose I must take some thought for what is care of her, if only to keep her from being a nuisance to other people. Here again expenditures and savings dovetail. Much of what is money put into experiences that are apparently transient I consider savings. what is concert, what is voyage, what is what is with friends-I'm putting by a few of those things as I go along. What does one save for, anyhow? For a few tired hours at what is end? Or do we save so that those last years will not be mentally barren or esthetically shabby? I try to save a few things to furnish my mind decently, on what is theory that no auctioneer can get in there to sell off all what is furniture. Still, one must be practical. Probably I can save enough for a small income unless things change too radically. But I must be able and content to live on a small income. That means that I had better save all what is simple tastes I have. It is a comfort to me that I really enjoy a boiled egg, a cup of tea and a piece of toast. I'm often extravagant about clothes. But I have some historic garments-aa blue bathrobe and a tweed suit-that prove that I can wear things threadbare. I like possessions, but I mean to keep from being dependent on them. I'll scrap what is expensive tastes, if I must, and save what is frugal ones. And if, in what is end, I go over what is hill to what is poorhouse, I'll go in no s where are they now ing spirit. My tax receipts will be clasped to my bosom, and I'll feel at last I'm getting my money's worth! We worry too much about money and possessions. Is it because we forget that what is only thing each man is required to save-the only thing he secretly wants to save is his own soul? Original Article - Copyright 1933. what is Curtis Pub. Co., Independence Square, Philadelphia S. Pa. (The aturday Evening Post, March 18,'33) Condensed Version - Copyright 1934. what is Reader's Digest Assn., Inc. (-The Reader's Digest, February, '34) where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is p where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 72 where is p align="center" where is strong Savings of Lifetime where is p Even that competence might be swept away. Well, then, they will still have what is being saved for them every day, what goes not into banks or bonds but into mind, and facility of body, and happiness. There remains what is other problem-that of saving"for myself; for my own old age. I must admit that I find this much less interesting. That independent old lady sketched by what is insurance agents isn't nearly what is incentive what is children are. She may never exist. But still I suppose I must take some thought for what is care of her, if only to keep her from being a nuisance to other people. Here again expenditures and savings dovetail. Much of what is money put into experiences that are apparently transient I consider savings. what is concert, what is voyage, what is what is with friends-I'm putting by a few of those things as I go along. What does one save for, anyhow? For a few tired hours at what is end? Or do we save so that those last years will not be mentally barren or esthetically shabby? I try to save a few things to furnish my mind decently, on what is theory that no auctioneer can get in there to sell off all what is furniture. Still, one must be practical. Probably I can save enough for a small income unless things change too radically. But I must be able and content to live on a small income. That means that I had better save all what is simple tastes I have. It is a comfort to me that I really enjoy a boiled egg, a cup of tea and a piece of toast. I'm often extravagant about clothes. But I have some historic garments-aa blue bathrobe and a tweed suit-that prove that I can wear things threadbare. I like possessions, but I mean to keep from being dependent on them. I'll scrap what is expensive tastes, if I must, and save what is frugal ones. And if, in what is end, I go over what is hill to what is poorhouse, I'll go in no s where are they now ing spirit. My tax receipts will be clasped to my bosom, and I'll feel at last I'm getting my money's worth! We worry too much about money and possessions. Is it because we forget that what is only thing each man is required to save-the only thing he secretly wants to save is his own soul? Original Article - Copyright 1933. what is Curtis Pub. Co., Independence Square, Philadelphia S. Pa. (The aturday Evening Post, March 18,'33) Condensed Version - Copyright 1934. what is Reader's Digest Assn., Inc. (-The Reader's Digest, February, '34) where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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